Resources by Robert Grisso

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Air Conditioning System?
As you begin the process of selecting the most efficient air conditioning system for your home, investigate the critical issues of system size, placement, installation, and contractor experience. Your goal is to obtain an efficient system by: sizing the system for the specific cooling load of your home; selecting and properly installing the thermostats or controls; designing a ductwork system to deliver the correct amount of conditioned air to each space; and sealing and insulating all ductwork.
Feb 3, 2020 2901-9001 (BSE-289NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What About Using Ceiling Fans?
Ceiling fans create a breeze, so room occupants feel cooler and more comfortable. With a ceiling fan running, you can raise the thermostat setting by 2 to 4 degrees during the cooling season with no reduction in comfort. Increasing the room temperature by even two degrees can cut your cooling costs 4 to 6%.
Mar 26, 2020 2901-9002 (BSE-290NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What About the Ductwork?
Air distribution or duct systems are designed to supply rooms with air that is “conditioned”—that is, heated or cooled by the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment—and to recirculate or return the same volume of air back to the HVAC equipment. Your duct system has two main air transfer systems: 1) supply, and 2) return. The supply side delivers the conditioned air to the home through individual room registers. The return side picks up inside air and delivers it to the air handler of your central system where heat and moisture are either removed or added and then delivered to the supply side. All of the air drawn into the return duct(s) is conditioned and should be delivered back through the supply registers.
Apr 3, 2020 2901-9003 (BSE-291NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Heating System?
The efficiency of a gas (natural or propane) or oil furnace is measured by the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), which describes the heat produced from the energy used. This rating takes into consideration losses from pilot lights, start-up, and stopping. For example, a furnace with an AFUE rating of 80 converts 80% of the fuel it burns into usable heat. New furnaces usually rate in the mid-70s to low 80s, whereas older furnaces will be in the 50s or 60s. ENERGY STAR® qualified oil and gas furnaces have annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) ratings of 83% and 90%, or higher, making them up to 15% more efficient than standard models. Unlike the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Heating Season Performance Factor (HSPF) ratings, the AFUE does not consider the unit’s electricity use for fans and blowers.
May 12, 2020 2901-9005 (BSE-292NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Insulation?
Insulation is rated in terms of thermal resistance, called R-value, which indicates the resistance to heat flow. Although insulation can slow heat flow—conduction, convection and radiation—its greatest impact is on conduction.
Apr 14, 2020 2901-9006 (BSE-293NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Laundry Area?
The laundry room can be a big consumer of energy—more than 1,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) a year—and water—and a big producer of unwanted heat and humidity in the summer. It makes good sense to think about both the location and the appliances in it if you want to run an energy-efficient laundry. And there are new washers and dryers on the market now that make it easier than ever to do so.
Mar 25, 2020 2901-9007 (BSE-294NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Mold?
Mold has received a lot of attention of late because of high profile lawsuits and television news broadcasts that have highlighted the potential hazards and liabilities associated with indoor mold. What is mold? Molds, along with mildews, yeasts, and mushrooms, all belong to the kingdom fungi. Fungi are unicellular or multicellular organisms that primarily use absorption as a means to obtain energy from their environment, unlike green plants, which use chlorophyll to obtain energy from sunlight. The term “mold” describes unwanted visible fungal growth. “Mildew” is fungi that grows on fabrics or that causes plant disease. The term “yeast” is fungi that are unicellular when cultured.
Mar 26, 2020 2901-9008 (BSE-295NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Water Heater?
Heating water is the third largest energy expense in your home, after heating and cooling the entire space; and, it can account for 15-25% of your utility bill. It’s not hard to see why a family of four, each taking a 5-minute shower a day under inefficient showerheads, can use 700 gallons of water in a week representing a 3-year supply of drinking water for one person! There are several ways to cut down the amount you spend on heating water: a) insulate your water heater and pipes; b) reduce the amount of hot water you use; and c) turn down the thermostat on your water heater.
Mar 24, 2020 2901-9009 (BSE-296NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Windows?
The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) offers a voluntary testing and certification program for thermal performance for windows and residential door products with glass. The NFRC does not conduct structural characteristics, such as impact-resistance, but rather serves as a complementary program that can test the whole window (including frame) for the following characteristics: U-Factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), Visible Transmittance, Air Leakage, and Condensation Resistance (see sample NFRC label) .
Mar 20, 2020 2901-9010 (BSE-297NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What Are the Differences Between Mobile and Modular Homes?
Mobile and modular homes are factory-built and generally differ in how much of the construction occurs at the factory. The greater the work at the factory, the less labor is needed where the home will be located.
Mar 20, 2020 2901-9011 (BSE-298NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What Can Builders Do to Help Prevent Moisture Problems in New Construction?
Buildings should be designed and built to provide comfortable and healthy levels of relative humidity. They should also prevent both liquid water from migrating through building components and water vapor from being trapped in building assemblies, like walls.
Feb 26, 2020 2901-9012 (BSE-299NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What Does the Shape of the House Have to Do With Energy Efficiency?
In a home, heat energy is transferred among all materials and substances that are of different temperatures—within the building materials, inside the building itself, and outside the building envelope. The term “building envelope” refers to all of the external building materials, windows, and walls that enclose the internal space. Heat moves only when there is a difference in temperature, and it always moves from the warm side to the cool side. Heat will continue to “flow” until any touching materials reach the same temperature. However, we usually want the inside of a home to have a different temperature from the outside.
Feb 12, 2020 2901-9013 (BSE-300NP)
ENERGY SERIES: Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use
If you're trying to decide whether to invest in a more energy-efficient appliance or if you'd like to determine your electricity loads, you may want to estimate appliance energy consumption.
Feb 26, 2020 2901-9014 (BSE-301NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Appliances?
When shopping for appliances, remember that there are actually three prices to consider. The first is the one everyone considers: the purchase price. The second price is for repairs and maintenance. The third price is often forgotten, but equally important: the operating cost of the appliance. Operating cost depends on the cost of fuel (kilowatt-hour, cubic foot, therm, etc.) in your region, how much you use the appliance as well as the way you use it, and the overall energy efficiency of the appliance. Operating cost shows up on your utility bill each month for the life of the appliance. Your refrigerator, for example, may operate effectively for 15–20 years and your dishwasher for about 10 years. You'll need to consider how any given appliance will affect your utility usage.
Feb 25, 2020 2908-9015 (BSE-302NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Bathroom?
Did you know the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that private homes account for more than 20 percent of the energy and about 55 percent of publicly supplied water consumed in the United States? We all know that we can save water if we just turn off the tap while brushing our teeth. We also know that when we reduce the amount of hot water used we also decrease the energy needed to heat the water. But, did you know there are products that can help you save water even when you have to use water?
Feb 12, 2020 2908-9016 (BSE-303NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Caulking and Weather-Stripping?
The greatest source of wasted heating and cooling energy in a home is air leaks. If you have a pair of 6' 8" exterior doors in your home that do not have weather-stripping, you can easily have an opening of ¼" all along the edge where the doors meet. This ¼" gap adds up to a 20-square-inch opening to the outside. If you saw a hole this big in your wall, wouldn’t you want it fixed?
Mar 26, 2020 2908-9017 (BSE-304NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Dishwashers?
It may come as a surprise that washing a load of dishes in the dishwasher uses less water than doing the same number of dishes by hand. (Dishwashers also do a better job of killing germs, because they use hotter water than you would normally use if washing by hand.) For each cycle, an ENERGYSTAR qualified dishwasher model uses about 4 gallons of water; a non-qualified model uses about 6 gallons.
Feb 24, 2020 2908-9018 (BSE-305NP)
ENERGY SERIES:What about House Design and Room Location?
While a good heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and other energy saving features can provide you with a comfortable indoor environment, it is even more efficient to prevent heat from entering the house in the first place. By designing a house with the right shape and orientation, and strategically locating rooms, you can save on energy costs for cooling and heating. If renting or purchasing, look for these same features in an existing home.
Feb 17, 2020 2908-9019 (BSE-306NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Moisture?
Air is made up of a mixture of gases including oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. It also contains water vapor—water in the form of a gas. The temperature of the air determines how much water vapor it can hold: warm air can hold more than cool air. When the air is saturated, it cannot hold any more, and any extra water vapor will condense into liquid form.
Feb 24, 2020 2908-9020 (BSE-307NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Radiant Barriers?
Reflective insulation systems are made from aluminum foils with a variety of backings such as roof sheathing, kraft paper, plastic film, cardboard, bubble wrap, etc. The resistance to heat flow depends on the direction of heat flow with this type of insulation most effective in reducing downward heat flow and requiring an air space next to the reflective side. Reflective systems are usually located between roof rafters, floor joists, or wall studs. Reflective insulation placed in walls or on the attic floor must be perforated to allow water vapor to pass through it.
Feb 14, 2020 2908-9021 (BSE-308NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Refrigerators and Freezers?
Your refrigerator is the only appliance that works continuously in your home 24 hours a day. In most households, the refrigerator is the single biggest energy consuming kitchen appliance. According to ENERGY STAR, replacing a refrigerator bought in 1990 with a new ENERGY STAR qualified model can save enough to pay for lighting an average household for nearly four months.
Feb 14, 2020 2908-9022 (BSE-309NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about the Roof?
Roofing is more than shingles, tile, or metal. A roof system consists of several components, properly assembled to provide the appropriate shelter for a structure. These include structural elements, moisture barriers, and possibly insulation or ventilation.
Feb 12, 2020 2908-9023 (BSE-310NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Ventilation?
“Ventilation” is “the natural or mechanical process of supplying conditioned or unconditioned air to, or removing air from, any space.” “Infiltration” is the uncontrolled leakage of air through cracks and gaps in the building envelope, especially around windows and doors. Infiltration deals with uncontrolled situations. In our homes we want to be able to control air movement.
Feb 12, 2020 2908-9024 (BSE-311NP)
ENERGY SERIES: What is the Whole-House Systems Approach to Energy Efficiency?
The whole-house systems approach looks at the entire house as an energy system with interdependent parts. Like a human body, when one part functions poorly it affects the performance of the entire system. For instance, the benefits of an energy-efficient air conditioner are lessened when a duct system leaks, windows don’t close tightly, the attic is uninsulated, and humid summer breezes are drifting in under the door.
Feb 12, 2020 2908-9025 (BSE-312NP)
Lighting and Marking Recommendations for Animal-Drawn Carriages, Buggies and Wagons
Horse-drawn buggies or wagons and other animal-drawn carriages have been used by the Plain Communities as the primary means of transportation for generations. Equestrian sports and tourism business enterprises have also increased the number of horse-drawn carriages on streets and highways.
May 13, 2020 3006-1454 (BSE-333NP)
Driving Safely in Plain Communities Nov 6, 2017 3102-1533 (BSE-219NP)
Virginia Agriculture - Relating to Farmers Nov 8, 2017 3104-1591 (BSE-218NP)
Preventing Falls In and Around Homes Nov 3, 2017 3307-1592 (BSE-217NP)
Preventing Work Place Falls Nov 3, 2017 3307-1593 (BSE-220NP)
Deep Tillage Prior to No-Till Corn: Research and Recommendations Mar 29, 2019 424-053
Droplet Chart / Selection Guide
When choosing nozzles/droplet sizes for spray applications, applicators must consider both coverage needed and drift potential. As a rule, smaller droplets provide better coverage, but larger droplets are less likely to drift.
Aug 13, 2019 442-031 (BSE-263P)
Nozzles: Selection and Sizing
This fact sheet covers nozzle description, recommended use for common nozzle types, and orifice sizing for agricultural and turf sprayers. Proper selection of a nozzle type and size is essential for correct and accurate pesticide application. The nozzle is a major factor in determining the amount of spray applied to an area, uniformity of application, coverage obtained on the target surface, and amount of potential drift.
Aug 13, 2019 442-032 (BSE-262P)
Using Tractor Test Data for Selecting Farm Tractors
The test reports published by Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory (NTTL) can be extremely useful for selecting tractors or for comparing the performance of different makes and models of tractors. For example, when farmers are in the market for a tractor, the performance data in the NTTL reports can be used to select a tractor that will meet their needs. These reports can also serve as an effective tool for making tractor sales. Dealership personnel can use the performance data to compare their products to those of their competitors.
May 26, 2020 442-072 (BSE-329P)
Predicting Tractor Diesel Fuel Consumption
Ability to predict tractor fuel consumption is very useful for budgeting and management. The objective of this factsheet is to develop relationships using field measurements and Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory results to estimate tractor fuel consumption. Using these equations, farmers can estimate and compare the fuel consumption for different operating and loading conditions.
May 13, 2020 442-073 (BSE-328P)
Arthritis and Farming Apr 10, 2020 442-083 (BSE-317P)
Assistive Technologies in Agriculture
The goal of this publication is to introduce readers to the Assistive Technologies (ATs) used in agriculture and to the steps involved in the design of a successful AT system. This publication also discusses both common and operation-specific AT systems used in agriculture and how they influence secondary injuries, and it provides lists of agencies and resources that can help farmers and ranchers with the implementation of ATs.
May 13, 2020 442-084 (BSE-325P)
Preventing Secondary Injuries in Agricultural Workplaces
The intent of this fact sheet is to reduce the number of secondary injuries by familiarizing the readers with secondary injuries and the steps they can adopt to minimize them. In addition to identifying common secondary injuries and the most vulnerable groups, the publication discusses steps that can be taken to prevent such injuries. The fact sheet also provides a list of agencies that farmers can contact for assistance when they experience secondary injuries.
Apr 16, 2020 442-085 (BSE-316P)
Machinery Safety on the Farm
Machines; no farm or ranch can function without them. They save valuable time and are essential to agricultural productivity. They also represent an ever-present danger to the people who operate them. There are a host of hazards that makes agricultural machinery the leading cause of injury and death on American farms and ranches.
May 28, 2020 442-092 (BSE-324P)
Safe Operation of Compact Tractors
Follow these safety tips and maintenance procedures for checking, servicing, and operating compact tractors to extend their life and reduce breakdowns and accidents.
Apr 14, 2020 442-093 (BSE-313)
Determining Forage Moisture Concentration
Harvesting and storing forage at the proper moisture concentration is essential to producing a high-quality product. Ideally, hay forage should have a moisture concentration between 15 percent and 18 percent during baling. Hay baled at higher moisture levels is subject to heat damage, dry-matter loss, mold spoilage, and hay fires. Protein and total digestible nutrient losses are increased for hay baled at lower moisture levels. Baling at the proper moisture level is critical to making quality hay, especially for larger bales (round and square) since moisture and heat dissipate more slowly in comparison to smaller bales.
Jul 2, 2020 442-106(BSE-330P)
“Gear Up and Throttle Down” to Save Fuel
“Gear-up and throttle-down” (GUTD) is a fuel-saving practice that can be used for saving fuel when drawbar loads are lighter (<75 percent of rated power) and PTO (power takeoff) speed can be reduced.
May 13, 2020 442-450 (BSE-326P)
Five Strategies for Extending Machinery Life
Machinery ownership and operation is a major crop and livestock production cost. Several strategies when combined can significantly affect costs, improve machine reliability, and improve profit margins.
May 13, 2020 442-451 (BSE-327P)
Plumbing Systems of Agricultural Sprayers
The plumbing systems of agricultural sprayers are usually considered foolproof. Sprayer problems may occur if plumbing and/or modifications are improperly done or maintenance is ignored. Retrofitting, addition of electrical control systems, and replacement of pumps or nozzles require proper knowledge of the plumbing system and the implications of these changes to sprayer performance. Routine maintenance of the plumbing system is essential.
Apr 14, 2020 442-452 (BSE-319P)
Fine Tuning a Sprayer with “Ounce” Calibration Method
This extension publication discusses guidelines to quickly evaluate the performance of a sprayer. Sprayer calibration, nozzle discharge, spray pattern uniformity, speed checks, pump performance, and plumbing arrangements are evaluated with minimal calculations.
Apr 16, 2020 442-453 (BSE-320P)
Management Tips for Round Bale Hay Harvesting, Moving, and Storage
Hay production and feeding is one of the most expensive components of forage-livestock systems. Specific management practices are necessary to maintain hay quality and minimize hay loss during harvest, transportation and storage of large round bales.
Jul 1, 2020 442-454 (BSE-332P)
Large Round Bale Safety
This Extension publication covers the safety aspects of equipment used in large round bale packages such as: balers, front-end loaders, bale handling and transport devices. The key to safe and efficient systems for handling large round bales is an operator who knows the hazards involved and who follows safety practices that can prevent accidents. Operators must be constantly alert for situations that may cause injuries to themselves or others. Besides pain and suffering, accidents contribute to higher costs in terms of unnecessary downtime or costly machine repairs. Alertness and safety consciousness can result in more efficient and profitable baling and handling.
May 26, 2020 442-455 (BSE-331P)
Respiratory Protection in Agriculture
Farm workers can encounter a variety of respiratory problems ranging from temporary discomfort caused by allergic reactions to fatal asphyxiation. However, the risk of contracting serious lung diseases or death can be significantly decreased by using respiratory protection (fig. 1). See the sidebar for a list of farm work that requires respiratory protection.
Feb 28, 2020 442-601 (BSE-286P)
Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness
Farmers account for more than 30 percent of adults dis- abled by respiratory illness. Yet, a large percentage of farmers are nonsmokers. If smoking is not to blame for these ailments, then what is? The answer is farmer’s lung.
Feb 28, 2020 442-602 (BSE-287P)
Biodiesel Fuel
Biodiesel is a renewable fuel that can be made from vegetable oil, animal fat, and recycled cooking oils. Oils produced from algae, fungi, bacteria, molds, and yeast can also be used to produce biodiesel.
Jan 14, 2015 442-880 (BSE-180P)
Investing in GPS Guidance Systems? May 26, 2009 448-076
VCE Model of Community, Local, Regional Food Systems Oct 7, 2016 ALCE-154NP
Community, Local, and Regional Food Systems Nov 2, 2016 ALCE-155NP
Community, Local, and Regional Food Systems (CLRFS) Forum Report Oct 7, 2016 ALCE-156NP
Community, Local, and Regional Food Systems (CLRFS) Forum Executive Summary
Virginia’s food system directly impacts the survival and viability of farms and farmland; the economic development of rural and urban communities; the care, restoration, and resilience of ecological resources such as local waterways; and critical health issues. We use the language of community, local, and regional food systems to broadly define a complex and interconnected set of systems and pathways that comprise sustainable food production, processing, distribution, consumption, and waste management to bring about social, economic, and ecological change that benefits all residents.
Oct 7, 2016 ALCE-157NP
Environmental Best Management Practices for Virginia's Golf Courses Jan 9, 2019 ANR-48NP
2016 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included in this publication as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by Virginia Tech nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conforms to the product label. Be sure to obtain information about usage regulations and examine a current product label before applying any chemical.
Jan 28, 2016 AREC-157NP
2017 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
The primary considerations when selecting peanut varieties are yield, grade factors, disease, pests, and drought and heat response. A good practice is recording for each field the variety, yield, rainfall, and disease and insect incidence every year. This will allow producers to identify the most productive and less problematic fields, also the most productive varieties for each field.
Jan 6, 2017 AREC-197NP
Rotary Mowers Safety: Lawn Care Training Guide Mower Care and Safe Use
Mowing lawns continues to be one of the most popular summer job opportunities for youth given the affordable cost and ease in operation of most rotary mowers. However, easy access and widespread use of mowers often creates a false sense of security among the users of these machines. Data from a seven-year period (1996-2003) showed the highest rate of hospitalization from lawn mower injuries was for youth workers ages 15 to 19. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that more than 37,000 riding mower injuries occurred from 2003 through 2005 alone. During the same period, there were 95 fatalities due to riding mower tip-over. The purpose of this training guide is to reduce the number of mower accidents and injuries by familiarizing young workers with rotary mowers and their safe operation.
Apr 16, 2020 BSE-110P(BSE-315P)
ENERGY SERIES: What about Landscaping and Energy Efficiency?
The design and management of a landscape can have a notable impact on household energy consumption. Throughout the history of civilization, people have altered their dwellings and landscapes to make them more comfortable and energy efficient.
Jul 1, 2020 BSE-145NP(BSE-334NP)
Grape Production Injuries and Prevention
Grape acreage and production have been steadily increasing in the US. In 2010 there were approximately 23,000 farms with a total of 944,800 acres producing grapes. Ninety percent of these farms are smaller than 100 acres and about 16,000 of these were vineyards. California accounts for about 90% of the total production in the US. The next two largest grape producing states are Washington and New York and they produce approximately 6% and 2% respectively (NASS-USDA, 2014)
Jun 30, 2015 BSE-186NP
Accurate Application and Placement of Chemicals on Lawns Feb 12, 2020 BSE-318NP
Lawn Care: Hand Tools Safety May 16, 2019 BSE-40NP (BSE-98P)
Lawn Care: Powered Hand Tool Safety May 16, 2019 BSE-41NP (BSE-97P)
Lawn Care: Rotary Mower Safety May 16, 2019 BSE-42NP (BSE-96P)
Lawn Care: Tractor Safety May 16, 2019 BSE-43NP (BSE-100P)
Lawn Care: Utility-Type Vehicle Safety May 16, 2019 BSE-44NP (BSE-99P)
Guidelines for Protecting Youth Workers: Promote Safe Practices and Protect Youth Workers
The goal of this training guide is to reduce the number of accidents and related injuries among the youth workers in the green industry by making workplaces safer. This guide is primarily for employers or supervisors of youth workers in the green industry. In addition to familiarizing the employers/supervisors with the regulations associated with hiring youth workers, the guide discusses the steps they can take to make their work environments safer. It also covers the responsibilities of guardians and youth workers for making workplaces safer.
Apr 17, 2020 BSE-46NP (BSE-314P)
Rotary Mowers Safety: Lawncare Training Guide
Mowing lawns continues to be one of the most popular summer job opportunities for youth given the affordable cost and ease in operation of most rotary mowers. However, easy access and widespread use of mowers often creates a false sense of security among the users of these machines. Data from a seven-year period (1996-2003) showed the highest rate of hospitalization from lawn mower injuries was for youth workers ages 15 to 19. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that more than 37,000 riding mower injuries occurred from 2003 through 2005 alone. During the same period, there were 95 fatalities due to riding mower tip-over. The purpose of this training guide is to reduce the number of mower accidents and injuries by familiarizing young workers with rotary mowers and their safe operation.
Apr 16, 2020 BSE-47P (BSE-315P)
Tractor Safety: Lawn Care Training Guide, Safe Use of Tractors
Tractors are versatile equipment used in a variety of jobs ranging from hauling goods to lawn care to agriculture. While they are extremely versatile, they can be very dangerous unless they are used with care following safe practices
Apr 7, 2020 BSE-48P (BSE-321P)
Utility Type Vehicles: UTV Maintenance and Safe Use Lawn Care Training Guide
Utility type vehicles (UTVs) are popular equipment used in a variety of settings, including the lawn care industry. Their hauling capacity and versatility have increased their popularity, and they are widely used in rural, suburban, and urban settings for a variety of lawn care, agricultural, construction, and industrial applications. Considering that UTVs are widely used in the green industry, it is extremely important that young workers in the industry become familiar with the safe operation of UTVs. The purpose of this training guide is to familiarize young workers with the safe use of UTVs.
Aug 21, 2019 BSE-49P (BSE-264P)
Powered Hand Tools Safety: Lawn Care Training Guide
In addition to rotary mowers, many powered hand tools such as string trimmers, lawn edgers, hedge trimmers, and leaf blowers are widely used in lawn care. While these devices are very useful in making jobs easier and more efficient, they can be dangerous if used without proper training and care. In 1989 the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that power lawn trimmers and edgers alone have caused about 4,600 injuries annually that required medical attention. About one-third of these were eye-related.
Apr 28, 2020 BSE-50P (BSE-322P)
Hand Tools Safety: Lawn Care Training Guide Hand Tool Care and Safe Use
Many hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and pruners are used widely in lawn care operations. While these non-powered tools are not known to cause major injuries, they have the potential for injuries that may require absence from work and/or medical assistance when they are used improperly.
Apr 17, 2020 BSE-51P (BSE-323P)
Tractor-Mounted Lifts Jun 18, 2018 BSE-58NP (BSE-230NP)
Tractor-Mounted Vertical Lifts Jun 22, 2018 BSE-59NP (BSE-232NP)
Tractor-Mounted Inclined Lifts Jun 22, 2018 BSE-60NP (BSE-231NP)
Peer-reviewed document template Jul 20, 2016 VCE-750NP