Resources for Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Cotton
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per 30 foot of row can reduce cotton yield by 6 to 12%.
Sep 22, 2020 2805-1001 (SPES-266NP)
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2009 Dec 21, 2010 3012-1520
Growing Hulless Barley in the Mid-Atlantic Mar 20, 2019 424-022
Growing Bread Wheat in the Mid-Atlantic Region Mar 20, 2019 424-024
Tips for Profitable Variety Selection: How to Use Data From Different Types of Variety Trials Mar 29, 2019 424-040
Agronomy Handbook, 2000 May 1, 2009 424-100
Aphids in Virginia Small Grains: Life Cycles, Damage and Control Mar 20, 2019 444-018 (ENTO-306NP)
Winter Grain Mite
The adult is relatively large compared to other spider mites and is the only mite of economic importance with the anal pore (a tan to orange spot best seen with microscope, but can be seen with a hand lens) on the upper surface of the abdomen.
May 12, 2020 444-037
Integrated Pest Management Peanut Scouting Manual
In the competitive global peanut market, you need to lower production costs. At the same time, you also need to keep pesticide residues in peanuts to a minimum; protect rivers, streams, and lakes from runoff; and prevent chemicals from leaching through the soil to groundwater. Using IPM to protect crops only from pests that are likely to cause economic losses is a good way to meet these goals.
May 12, 2020 444-126
Identifying Soybean Fields at Risk to Leaf-Feeding Insects Nov 13, 2018 444-203 (SPES-74P)
Cereal Leaf Beetle, Biology and Management
Cereal leaf beetle, a native to Europe and Asia, was first detected in Michigan in 1962. Since that time it has spread throughout most of the mid-western and eastern United States and has become a significant pest of Virginia and North Carolina small grains. This insect can become very numerous in small grain fields and the larvae are capable of reducing grain yield by eating the green leaf tissue.
May 12, 2020 444-350
The Peanut Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory
The southern corn rootworm (SCR) has long been considered a major pest of peanuts in North Carolina and Virginia. However, researchers and Extension faculty at Virginia Tech and NC State have determined through more than 400 commercial field trials that the majority of peanut fields do not need to be treated. They have developed and tested a simple-to-use advisory that identifies those fields not at risk for pod damage or economic loss. The Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory can save you time and money as well as help you use insecticides more efficiently.
Nov 22, 2019 444-351(ENTO-340P)
Corn Earworm Biology and Management in Soybeans
Corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, is the most common and destructive insect pest of soybeans grown in Virginia. Although infestation severity varies, about one-third of our acreage is treated annually. This costs farmers 1.5 to 2 million dollars annually, and requires the application of many pounds of insecticide to crop lands. We may never eliminate this pest from Virginia soybeans, but knowledge of the biology and use of best management practices can help limit insecticide controls to those fields that meet economic threshold criteria. This publication provides current information on corn earworm biology, prediction of outbreaks, pest advisories, scouting procedures, and recently revised economic thresholds.
May 12, 2020 444-770
Above Ground Burial An Overview of the Technology Jun 28, 2021 APSC-179NP
Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center Oct 23, 2019 AREC-115NP (AREC-250NP)
Soybean Reproductive Development Stages
Remove the soybean plant at ground level to make it easier to stage. Examine each main stem node one at a time to determine the development stage. Focus on the top four nodes that contain fully developed leaves (shown below). A fully developed leaf is one that is located immediately below a node containing a leaf with unrolled or unfolded leaflets (leaflet edges are no longer touching). The soybean crop is considered to be at a particular stage when 50% of the plants reach that stage. Listed with stage description for R1 through R6 are the approximate number of days to R7, or physiological maturity, for full season (FS) soybean planted in May and double crop (DC) soybean planted in June/July.
Jul 25, 2019 AREC-59NP (SPES-156NP)
Soybean Insect Guide
Numerous kinds of insects can be found in soybeans. Most are beneficial or harmless, but some can cause yield loss and even crop failure if not controlled.
Mar 20, 2019 AREC-68NP
2021 Virginia On-Farm Soybean Research Jan 28, 2022 SPES-377NP
Peanut Variety and Quality Evaluation Results I. Agronomic and Grade Data Feb 18, 2022 SPES-382NP
2021 Cotton Variety Testing and On-Farm Results Feb 17, 2022 SPES-385NP
2021 Virginia Soybean Performance Tests Feb 21, 2022 SPES-386NP
2021 Peanut Variety and Quality Evaluation Results - Quality Data Mar 24, 2022 SPES-395NP
VCE AG Today: Soybean pest update Feb 13, 2022 VCE-1027-57NP
VCE AG Today: Soybean Variety Selection Tool Feb 10, 2022 VCE-1027-59NP