Resources by Scott M. Barrett

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Virginia Logger Safety Checklist Booklet Mar 23, 2018 3108-1592 (CNRE-10NP)
Guide to Threatened and Endangered Species on Private Lands In Virginia Sep 6, 2018 420-039
Skidder Safety and Efficiency: A Discussion Leader's Guide Mar 24, 2020 420-122 (BSE-288P)
Consider Logging Residue Needs for BMP Implementation When Harvesting Biomass for Energy
Utilization of woody biomass for energy has increased substantially in Virginia. While there are a number of definitions for biomass, woody biomass from forest harvesting operations typically refers to logging residues such as limbs, tops, and other unmerchantable material that would otherwise be left behind on-site after the logging operation is complete. Logging residues are typically chipped and then transported to facilities where they are used for fuel. Biomass harvesting in Virginia most commonly occurs on integrated harvesting operations where roundwood and biomass are harvested and utilized at the same time in a single operation.
Dec 13, 2019 ANR-108NP
Effectiveness of Skid Trail Closure Techniques. Forest Operations Research Highlights Dec 13, 2019 ANR-109NP
Effectiveness of Temporary Stream Crossing Closure Techniques Forest Operations Research Highlights
Protection of water quality is a critical component of forest harvesting operations. Virginia’s silvicultural water quality law (§10.1-1181.1 through 10.1-1181.7) prohibits excessive sedimentation of streams as a result of silvicultural operations. Virginia’s logging businesses invest substantial resources implementing BMPs to protect water quality. The Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) is responsible for enforcing this law and inspects all logging operations to ensure protection of water quality.
Dec 13, 2019 ANR-110NP
Rare Forested Natural Communities in Virginia Apr 3, 2017 ANR-260NP
Regional Forest Harvest Characteristics across Virginia Apr 27, 2017 ANR-264NP
Slash Application Cost Estimates for Skid Trail Closure in the Virginia Piedmont
Best management practices (BMPs) were developed after the passage of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 to mitigate pollutants and sediment from entering streams. Forest operations are a potential source of sediment to streams surrounding harvest areas. Specifically, roads, skid trails, landings, and stream crossings can cause accelerated erosion due to the soil disturbance caused by logging equipment and exposure of bare soil (Appelboom et al. 2002). Soil erosion can result in decreased productivity, degraded water quality, and increased costs associated with state and federal environmental regulations.
Jul 11, 2017 ANR-273NP
The Role of Logging Business Owners in Forest Certification Nov 9, 2018 ANR-51NP (CNRE-35NP)
A Summary of Logging Business Responsibilities Related to Wage and Hour Rules and OSHA Regulations in Virginia Dec 21, 2021 CNRE-135NP
Impact of Planting Treatments on Eastern White Pine Seedling Survival and Growth at the Matthews State Forest in Grayson County, Virginia Dec 20, 2021 CNRE-137NP