ID

2901-1062

Authors as Published

Alex X. Niemiera, Professor, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech

This publication is available in a PDF file format only.

In about the first thirty years, the branching habit of the native pin oak is truly unique. The upper branches are ascending, the middle ones horizontal, and the lower ones drooping. The drooping lower branches make pin oak a poor street tree. It is better placed in locations where the lower branches will not be a nuisance. Suitable for bonsai. 


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Virginia Cooperative Extension is a partnership of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments. Its programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, military status, or any other basis protected by law.

Publication Date

October 5, 2018