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Community Planning

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Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
Assessing Community Needs for Child Care

The need for child care has been documented nationally through state and national efforts, publications, and demographic studies by public, private, and federal agencies and organizations that serve the interests of children and families.

May 1, 2009 350-056
Basic First-Aid Supplies Jun 24, 2014 VCE-409NP
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 10: Dry Swale Sep 6, 2013 426-129 (BSE-86P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 11: Wet Swale

A wet swale (WS) is an engineered, best management
practice (BMP) arranged in a straight line that is
designed to reduce stormwater pollution. A WS consists
of a shallow, gently sloping channel with broad,
vegetated, side slopes and slow flows (see figure 1).
Wet swales typically stay wet because the bottom of the
swale is below the water table. This is done to encourage
the growth of wetland vegetation, providing water
quality treatment similar to a natural wetland. This
stormwater treatment practice also functions as part of
the stormwater conveyance system. Wet swales have a
relatively low capital cost; however, maintenance can
be is intensive and expensive when compared to other
BMPs.

Sep 9, 2013 426-130 (BSE-89P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 12: Filtering Practices

A stormwater filtering practice (FP) treats stormwater
runoff by passing it through an engineered filter media
consisting of either sand, gravel, organic matter, and/
or a proprietary manufactured product, collecting it in
an underdrain, and then discharging the effluent to a
stormwater conveyance system. FPs are stormwater
treatment practices that are often obtained from the
marketplace due to unique proprietary technologies
(see figure 1).

Sep 9, 2013 426-131 (BSE-87P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 14: Wet Ponds

Wet ponds (WP) are ponds or lakes which provide treatment
and storage of stormwater. The water depth is set
by a structure known as an outlet structure. Wet ponds
are probably the most well-known best management
practice for treatment of stormwater. Because of their
size, they are usually designed to include storage above
the normal pool elevation. This added storage can provide
reductions in downstream flooding and assist in
protecting stream channels. They tend to be large; in
some cases, they can become a passive community
amenity (See Figure 1).

Sep 9, 2013 426-133 (BSE-79P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 15: Extended Detention Ponds

Extended detention ponds (EDs) are dry detention ponds
that provide 12 to 24 hours of runoff storage during peak
runoff events (see figure 1). Releases from the ED ponds
are controlled by an outlet structure. During a storm
event, as the discharge restriction is reached, water backs
up into the ED pond. The pool slows flow velocities and
enables particulate pollutants to settle. Peak flows are
also reduced. ED ponds have the lowest overall pollutant-
removal rate of any stormwater treatment option,
so they are often combined with other upstream, lowimpact
development (LID) practices to better maximize
pollutant-removal rates. Due to their placement at the exit
point of the watershed, ED is often the last opportunity
to treat stormwater before it is discharged to a stream.
Because of its low treatment performance, an ED should
be viewed as the treatment option of last resort.

Sep 9, 2013 426-134 (BSE-82P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 2: Sheet Flow to Open Space Sep 6, 2013 426-121 (BSE-83P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 3: Grass Channels Sep 6, 2013 426-122 (BSE-88P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 4: Soil Restoration Sep 6, 2013 426-123 (BSE-80P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 5: Vegetated Roofs Sep 6, 2013 426-124 (BSE-81P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 7: Permeable Pavement Sep 6, 2013 426-126 (BSE-84P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 8: Infiltration Practices Mar 2, 2012 426-127 (BSE-85P)
Biological & Chemical Terrorism Jun 24, 2014 VCE-410NP
Child Emergency Preparedness Jun 24, 2014 VCE-411NP
Community Engagement

A local leader, public official, or planner generates an idea and prepares to launch it into action. It soon becomes clear that a key ingredient is missing: the support and ideas of the impacted community. This scenario is not uncommon and is often associated with a plan that will fail. 

Sep 10, 2014 CV-38P
Community Engagement: Successes in Virginia Communities Oct 22, 2012 CV-22NP
Denitrification Management Mar 27, 2013 BSE-54P
Denitrifying Bioreaders: An Emerging Best Management Practice to Improve Water Quality Apr 12, 2013 BSE-55P
Earthquakes Jun 25, 2014 VCE-412NP
Extension Leadership Councils: Planning for Success

An Extension Leadership Council (ELC) is a key ingredient for success in developing, implementing, and evaluating Extension programs that serve the local community. This publication offers practical guidelines and resources for successfully engaging a local ELC. Contents include council responsibilities, criteria for membership, a sample position description, focus topics for regular meetings, and a template for meeting agendas.

Mar 25, 2010 490-394
FACILITATION SERIES: Facilitating Group Discussions Generating & Narrowing Ideas and Planning for Implementation

Facilitators use a variety of tools to guide
groups in the decision-making process.
Depending on the maturity of the group and
the defined goals, facilitators may begin by
discussing the values the group holds and
building the common ground on which
decisions will be based. Many times,
groups are “fuzzy” on what they want to
accomplish and need to spend time
discussing what the end result should be.
To begin this conversation on the vision, a
facilitator might ask “if this were perfect,
what would it look like?” With a clear vision,
the group begins the process of generating
ideas, narrowing down the ideas into a list
of priorities, and finally developing a plan for
implementation that includes accountability
measures.

Mar 2, 2012 CV-7
FACILITATION SERIES: The Dynamics of Group Decision Making

Facilitators use a variety of tools to guide
groups in the decision-making process.
Depending on the maturity of the group and
the defined goals, facilitators may begin by
discussing the values the group holds and
building the common ground on which
decisions will be based. Many times,
groups are “fuzzy” on what they want to
accomplish and need to spend time
discussing what the end result should be.
To begin this conversation on the vision, a
facilitator might ask “if this were perfect,
what would it look like?” With a clear vision,
the group begins the process of generating
ideas, narrowing down the ideas into a list
of priorities, and finally developing a plan for
implementation that includes accountability
measures.

Mar 2, 2012 CV-8
Facilitation Series: The Things Facilitators Say . . .

There are times when a facilitator pauses a group in its discussion to allow the group to reflect
on what has happened, start a discussion, clarify an issue, evaluate its progress, or encourage
participation from all members. During these moments, the right statement or question will help
transition the group to a new thought process. A facilitator’s goal is to guide the group through
the process for accomplishing the defined task while maintaining a good rapport with the group.

Feb 16, 2012 CV-6
Facilitator’s Guidebook - 2011, Community-Based Food System Assessment and Planning Jul 15, 2013 3108-9029 (CV-30NP)
Floods Jun 25, 2014 VCE-413NP
Food Deserts in Virginia Jan 22, 2014 VCE-294NP
Foundations for a Successful Farmers Market

Starting a farmers market is a challenging task with numerous issues to be tackled and activities to sequence. While generating a customer and vendor base is clearly fundamental to the successful establishment of a farmers market, there are also key administrative foundations that should be established if the market is to get off on the right foot and have long-term viability.

Apr 27, 2010 448-502
Household Water Quality in Clarke County, Virginia

In June 2013, residents from Clarke County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE)office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 51samples were tested, serving 120 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were hardness, sodium, and lead as well as the presence of E. coli and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options.

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-166NP
Household Water Quality in Floyd County, Virginia

 In March 2013, residents from Floyd County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 78 samples were tested, serving 172 individuals. 

Aug 29, 2014 BSE-153NP
Household Water Quality in Frederick County, Virginia

In June 2013, residents from Frederick County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension(VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 78 samples were tested, serving 189 individuals.The most common household water quality issues identified were hardness, manganese, lead and sodium, as well as the presence of E. coli and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options.

Sep 9, 2014 BSE-170NP
Household Water Quality in Goochland and Powhatan Counties, Virginia

 In February 2013, residents from Goochland and Powhatan Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings, where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 24 samples were tested, serving 55 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of copper, lead, and the presence of acidic water and total coliform bacteria. 

Sep 3, 2014 BSE-155NP
Household Water Quality in Halifax County, Virginia

 In August 2013, residents from Halifax County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 101 samples were tested, serving 213 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of lead and copper, as well as the presence of acidic water and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 3, 2014 BSE-156NP
Household Water Quality in Hanover County, Virginia

 In April 2013, residents from Hanover County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 74 samples were tested, serving 151 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of lead and copper, as well as the presence of acidic water and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 3, 2014 BSE-157NP
Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia Sep 5, 2014 BSE-158NP
Household Water Quality in Montgomery County, Virginia

 In March 2013, residents from Montgomery County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 60 samples were tested, serving 150 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of hardness, sodium and the presence of total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 5, 2014 BSE-159NP
Household Water Quality in New Kent and Charles City Counties, Virginia

 In July 2013, residents from New Kent and Charles City Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to data collected, 33 samples were tested, serving 81 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of sodium and the presence of total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 5, 2014 BSE-160NP
Household Water Quality in Nottoway County, Virginia

In September 2013, residents from Nottoway County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 44 samples were tested, serving 99 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of copper, lead, as well as the presence of acidic water and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 5, 2014 BSE-161NP
Household Water Quality in Page County, Virginia

In June 2013, residents from Page County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected,70 samples were tested, serving 113 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were low pH, hardness and sodium, as well as the presence of total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options.

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-169NP
Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia Sep 5, 2014 BSE-162NP
Household Water Quality in Pulaski and Wythe Counties Virginia

 In May 2013, residents from Pulaski and Wythe Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 105 samples were tested, serving 206 individuals, according to survey data collected. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of lead, hardness, sodium and the presence of pathogen indicator bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-163NP
Household Water Quality in Roanoke County, Virginia

 In May 2013, residents from Roanoke County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 71 samples were tested, serving 146 individuals, according to survey data collected. The most common household water quality issues identified were high levels of lead, copper and the presence of total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options. 

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-164NP
Household Water Quality in Shenandoah County, Virginia

In June 2013, residents from Shenandoah County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 81 samples were tested, serving 174 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were total dissolved solids, hardness, lead and sodium, as well as the presence of E. coli and total coliform bacteria. The figure found a the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards causes and treatment options.

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-167NP
Household Water Quality in Warren County, Virginia

In June 2013, residents from Warren County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Clinic participants received a confidential water sample analysis and attended educational meetings where they learned how to interpret their water test results and address potential issues. According to survey data collected, 72samples were tested, serving 134 individuals. The most common household water quality issues identified were hardness, low pH/acidic water, sodium and total coliform bacteria. The figure found at the end of this report shows these common water quality issues along with basic information on standards, causes, and treatment options.

Sep 8, 2014 BSE-168NP
How Do Stream Buffers Reduce the Offsite Impact of Pollution? Jul 30, 2012 BSE-38P
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Conducting the Liability Assessment Jul 27, 2012 CV-18NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: How Much Liability Insurance Coverage Should I Have? Jul 27, 2012 CV-17NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Insurance Factsheet Jul 27, 2012 CV-16NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Questions to Ask when compairing insurance coverage Jul 30, 2012 CV-19NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Sources of Insurance Dec 10, 2012 CV-26NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Virginia Attorneys: Members of the American Agricultural Law Association Jul 30, 2012 CV-20NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Workers' Compensation & Vendor Liability for Farmers' Market Owners and Operators Oct 29, 2012 CV-24NP
Managing Liability Jan 30, 2013 CV-25P
NONPROFIT BOARD LEADERSHIP: Understanding the Role of a Board Member

You have decided to say yes and accept the invitation to serve on the board of directors for a nonprofit
organization. You have the knowledge and experience to be a great board member. But, you also have
served on numerous nonprofit boards and realized that your past commitments have ranged from being
heavily involved in the organization’s work to avoiding the meetings. As you prepare for this new role,
you wonder what organizational differences made you drift in your commitment or created the stronger
connection resulting in either fulfilling or neglecting board member duties.

Mar 7, 2012 CV-9
Pet Preparedness Jul 10, 2014 VCE-414NP
Powell River Project - Reclaiming Mined Lands as Industrial Sites

With the decline of coal-mining jobs in Virginia’s coalfields, availability of local employment in high-wage industries is a major concern. One factor that hinders high-wage manufacturing industries from locating in the coalfield region is a shortage of suitable industrial sites. In some cases, coal surface mines can create sites suitable for industry as a post-mining land use while meeting all Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) requirements.

Dec 2, 2009 460-132
Powell River Project - Stabilizing Reclaimed Mines to Support Buildings and Development

Land-use constraints hinder economic activity in the Virginia coalfield region; the lack of flat land hinders infrastructure construction, industrial recruitment, and business development. Reclaimed coal mines are widely discussed as potential development sites, but modern reclamation rarely prepares mined areas for building-support purposes. This publication describes mine-stabilization procedures that can be employed for developing reclaimed mine areas for building construction.

This publication outlines general concepts and guidelines. Parties seeking to construct buildings on any mined area should engage the services of a professional engineer.

Dec 2, 2009 460-130
Preparing for an Emergency: Make a Family Emergency Kit Sep 1, 2014 VCE-486NP
Preparing for an Emergency: The Smart Thing to Do

Preparing for emergencies is not new.  Your grandparents probably have extra supplies, such as: soap and shampoo in the bathroom closets, onions and potatoes stored in the basement, and canned goods on pantry shelves in their home.  They understood the value of having a little extra on hand in case of emergencies.

Oct 1, 2014 3104-1590 (VCE-467NP/VCE-468NP)
The Virginia GIS County Data Series

The Virginia GIS (geographic information system) County Data Series is part of an effort by the Virginia Geospatial Extension Program to facilitate increased awareness of and access to geospatial products and services by educators, local governments, state agencies, and other entities. This extensive collection of GIS data provides some of the most up-to-date and accurate framework data available. 

May 1, 2009 303-104
Tornadoes Jul 10, 2014 VCE-415NP
Understanding Virginia’s Planning Commissions Dec 20, 2011 CV-2
Urban Forestry Issues May 1, 2009 420-180
Urban Stormwater: Terms and Definitions Sep 5, 2013 426-119 (BSE-78P)
Value, Benefits, and Costs of Urban Trees May 1, 2009 420-181
Virginia Master Naturalist Oct 27, 2014 465-300 (ANR-117NP)