ID

SPES-325NP

Authors as Published

Authored by Jose Garcia-Gonzalez, Doctoral Candidate, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mary Ann Hansen, Extension Plant Pathologist, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech; Laura K. Strawn, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Department of Food Science & Technology, Virginia Tech; and Steve L. Rideout, Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech

This publication is available in a PDF file format only. 

Sclerotium rolfsii is a necrotrophic, soilborne, fungal plant pathogen that is present in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. It causes a disease commonly known as “southern blight” on a variety of host plants. It was first described in tomato plantings in Florida in the late 19th century. In the United States, the disease is more problematic in southern states where warm and humid conditions favor the pathogen. Over the last decade, southern blight has increasingly become an issue in vegetable and field crops in Virginia and across the mid-Atlantic region. This publication provides an overview (e.g., signs, symptoms) and how to control.


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Publication Date

August 24, 2021