ID

452-510 (SPES-158P)

Authors as Published

G.L. Mullins, Professor and Extension Nutrient Management Specialist, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech; M.M. Alley, W.G. Wysor Professor, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech; S.B. Phillips, Assistant Professor, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Eastern Shore AREC; Reviewed by Rory Maguire, Professor and Extension Specialist, School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech

This publication is available in a PDF file format only.

Acid soil limits crop yields on many Virginia farms. With only a few exceptions, the climate in Virginia causes unlimed soils to be moderately to strongly acidic. This soil acidity can be directly toxic to plants but more often; it reduces the plants' efficiency at nutrient utilization, especially phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and nitrogen (N). Proper management of soil acidity is the foundation of efficient soil fertility management in Virginia.


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Publication Date

August 9, 2019