Resources for Agricultural Insects Pests

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Compact Soil Sampling Strategy for White Grubs
Annual white grubs (WG) are early-season pests attacking corn seeds and seedlings
Jun 30, 2011 2802-7027
Cucumber Beetles May 1, 2009 2808-1009
Cabbage Webworm May 1, 2009 2811-1022
Wireworm Pest Management in Potatoes May 1, 2009 2812-1026
Insect Pest Management in Virginia: Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean 2010 May 1, 2009 2812-1027
Potato Aphid on Tomatoes May 1, 2009 2901-1031
Green Peach Aphid on Vegetables May 1, 2009 2902-1081
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug May 21, 2009 2902-1100
Japanese Beetle
The Japanese beetle is found throughout Virginia and in most of the Eastern United States. In regions west of the Mississippi it is found in isolated pockets. Japanese beetles were first found in New Jersey in 1916 and have spread from that point since. The Japanese beetle has been well established in Virginia since the early 1970’s.
Dec 11, 2014 2902-1101 (ENTO-97NP)
Making Replant Decisions for Slug Damaged Corn and Soybean Stands May 14, 2009 2905-1293
Cucumber Beetle Management in Melons Jul 21, 2009 2906-1303
Scouting for Wireworms before Planting Vegetables Jul 24, 2009 2906-1329
Controlling Bean Leaf Beetle on Snap Beans Jul 16, 2009 2906-1332
Insecticide Label Updates Jul 27, 2009 2906-1337
Management of Aphids in Spinach Jul 27, 2009 2906-1338
Stinger Registered For Virginia-Grown Strawberries Jul 28, 2009 2906-1346
Asparagus Beetles on Asparagus Jul 29, 2009 2906-1352
Bug vs. Bug - Managing Plant Diseases with Biofungicides Jul 29, 2009 2906-1354
Chemical Control of European Corn Borer in Bell Pepper Jul 29, 2009 2906-1355
Sampling for European Corn Borer in Bell Pepper Jul 30, 2009 2906-1356
Cruiser 5FS: Supplemental Label for Use on Edible Beans Jul 30, 2009 2906-1357
A Summary of Recent Pesticide Registrations and Other Updates (Extracted from the Virginia Crop Pest Advisory Newsletter) Aug 10, 2009 2906-1373
Catalpa Sphinx Caterpillar
Catalpa sphinx caterpillars, also known as “Catalpa worms”, are major defoliators of catalpa, their only host. With their chewing mouthparts, they strip away large portions of the leaves. In heavy infestations they can completely defoliate the entire tree. Apparently trees on high ground with poor soil are rarely, if ever, attacked. In some years, depending on the region, many trees will have all their leaves stripped away by the end of the summer. This may be followed by years with no defoliation observed at all. The fluctuation between outbreak and no defoliation is largely due to the activity of parasites.
Nov 14, 2014 2911-1421 (ENTO-88NP)
European Hornet
The European hornet is a stout hornet approximately 1-inch long. The color of the head and thorax is dark reddish brown with deep yellow and brown black markings on the abdomen. The markings on the abdomen are similar to the markings found on yellow jackets. The European hornet resembles the cicada killer wasp but is more robust and has more hair on the thorax and abdomen (but is not as hairy as a bee).
Mar 12, 2015 2911-1422 (ENTO-123NP)
Twig Girdler/Twig Pruner
These beetles cause very conspicuous damage in late summer. The leaves on large numbers of twigs and branches will be observed to turn brown prematurely. These twigs and branches sometimes fall from trees in great numbers and accumulate. On close examination, the twigs have one of two kinds of damage. Twigs damaged by the twig girdler are cut as neatly as by a knife. The cut end has been gnawed almost straight across with a faint rounding and is slightly roughened by the chewing. The twig girdler is more commonly found on pecan and hickory. The twig pruner causes a slightly different type of cut. The twig will be observed to have a hollowed out space at the cut end filled with sawdust like frass. The twig when split open will have a long tunnel through most of its length. The twig pruner is more commonly found on oak.
Mar 16, 2015 2911-1423 (ENTO-124NP)
Virginia Pine Sawfly
The Virginia pine sawfly has been recorded from New Jersey and Maryland to North Carolina and westward to Illinois. Its main hosts are Virginia and shortleaf pines, but it also feeds on pitch and loblolly pine.
Mar 16, 2015 2911-1424 (ENTO-125NP)
Baldfaced Hornet
The baldfaced hornet is a large, black and white hornet up to 1 inch (25.4mm) in length. It is black and white in color with a mostly white head or face. It is widely distributed in Virginia. The nests are constructed of the same paper-like material as that of other wasps (yellowjackets). They differ a great deal from other wasp nests in being enclosed in a thick "paper" envelope. There is a single opening at the lower end of the nest and a few hornets always guard this. Nests are always abandoned at the end of the season. Hymenoptera, Vespidae: Dolichovespula maculata (L.)
Nov 3, 2014 3006-1449 (ENTO-84NP)
Bean Pod Mottle Virus in Virginia Soybeans Sep 9, 2010 3009-1461
Leaf‐ Footed Bugs Dec 21, 2010 3012-1522
Arthropod Pest Management Research on Vegetables in Virginia – 2010
This booklet contains arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in eastern Virginia in 2010.
Feb 22, 2011 3102-1532
Corn Earworm on Vegetables Mar 22, 2011 3103-1537
Gardening for Bees in Hampton Roads Apr 21, 2011 3104-1541
Beet Webworm Apr 25, 2011 3104-1542
Blister Beetles Feb 19, 2016 3104-1543 (ENTO-187NP)
Cabbage Looper Apr 25, 2011 3104-1544
Celery Leaftier Apr 25, 2011 3104-1545
Sap Beetles
Adults are usually black or brown beetles with an oval to oblong shape. They have clubbed or knobbed antennae and the economically important species typically measure 3–6 mm (0.12–0.24 inch) long. Some sap beetles have short wing covers that do not cover the entire abdomen. Some species have flattened bodies while others are more convex. Many sap beetles are a dull color, sometimes with mottling or spots. One common sap beetle, the picnic beetle [Glischrochilus quadrisignatus (Say)], is an attractive shiny black beetle with four yellow-orange bands or spots on the wing covers.
May 13, 2015 3104-1546(ENTO-157NP)
Cutworms Apr 25, 2011 3104-1547
Eggplant Lace Bug
Adult eggplant lace bugs are a mottled grayish to dark brown in color and measure 4 mm (0.16 inch) long. Their bodies are flattened but sculptured, with broad lateral projections behind the head and lace-like wings. The antennae are darker at the tips. Nymphs are wingless and yellow in coloration. They develop black markings and black antennae as they mature. Older nymphs have many spiny projections over the body. Mature nymphs measure about 2 mm (0.08 inch) long.
May 13, 2015 3104-1548(ENTO-153NP)
Flea Beetles Apr 25, 2011 3104-1549
Grasshoppers Apr 25, 2011 3104-1550
Hornworms on Tomato Apr 25, 2011 3104-1551
Imported Cabbageworm Apr 25, 2011 3104-1552
Leafhoppers Apr 25, 2011 3104-1553
Leafminers Apr 25, 2011 3104-1554
Mexican Bean Beetle Apr 25, 2011 3104-1555
Onion Thrips Apr 25, 2011 3104-1556
Parsleyworm Apr 25, 2011 3104-1557
Pepper Weevil Apr 25, 2011 3104-1558
Pickleworm May 13, 2015 3104-1559(ENTO-154NP)
Potato Tuberworm Apr 25, 2011 3104-1560
Raspberry Crown Borer Mar 24, 2016 3104-1561 (ENTO-208NP)
Rednecked Cane Borer Apr 15, 2016 3104-1562 (ENTO-210NP)
Rhubarb Curculio
Adult rhubarb curculios are elongated, somewhat cylindrical beetles measuring about 13-19 mm (0.5-0.75 inch) in total body length. They have an obvious long snout that curves downwards from the head. Young adults have a dusty coating of yellow or orange powder that rubs off easily. Older beetles that have lost this dusty coating appear brownish-black in color. Mature larvae are legless white grubs with a brown head capsule. Rhubarb curculio larvae are only found in weedy hosts and not in rhubarb itself. There are a number of related, similar-looking weevils that occur on various weeds in the Asteraceae and Polygonaceae families.
May 13, 2015 3104-1563(ENTO-155NP)
Rose Chafer Mar 24, 2016 3104-1564 (ENTO-209NP)
Rose Scale Apr 25, 2011 3104-1565
Squash Vine Borer
Adult squash vine borers are robust, attractive moths with dark wings and conspicuous orange abdomens dotted with black spots. The legs are marked with orange, black, and white, and the hind legs are noticeably feathery. Adults measure about 13 mm (0.5 inch) long with a wingspan of about 32 mm (1.25 inches). The dark wings are held folded at rest; there is a short fringe of hairs on the trailing edge. Squash vine borer is a member of the clearwing moth family; translucent windows are visible in the hind wings when they are fully extended. The antennae are dark, somewhat flattened, and hooked at the tips. Overall, adult squash vine borers resemble paper wasps in appearance. They are active day fliers with a zig-zag flight and easily travel from field to field.
May 13, 2015 3104-1566(ENTO-158NP)
Stalk Borer Apr 25, 2011 3104-1567
Tarnished Plant Bug Apr 25, 2011 3104-1568
Vegetable Weevil
Adult weevils are a dull, gray-brown color, and about 6–8 mm (0.25–0.32 inch) long. Adults are somewhat bristly in appearance due to t stout hairs and dense scales on the body. Usually there is a set of dark diagonal markings framing a lighter colored V-shape on the wings, but these may wear off with age. Antennae are elbowed and there is a short, stout snout at the front of the head.
May 13, 2015 3104-1569(ENTO-156NP)
White Grubs in Vegetable Gardens Apr 25, 2011 3104-1570
Whitefringed Beetles Apr 25, 2011 3104-1571
Carpenter Ants
Carpenter ants can be found outside on trees and sidewalks and indoor. Where they are found determines how best to control them. Inside they can be active indoors during many months of the year, usually during the spring and summer. When ants are active in the house during late winter/early spring (February/March), the infestation (nest) is probably within the household. In late spring large numbers of foraging ants may come in from outside looking for food and may not indicate and infestation. Outside carpenter ants become active in late spring and early summer and will be seen on tree trunks and sidewalks.
Mar 11, 2016 3104-1573 (ENTO-188NP)
Centipede - Chilopoda May 13, 2011 3104-1574
Click Beetle - Coleoptera: Elateridae May 13, 2011 3104-1575
Clothes Moths Mar 11, 2016 3104-1576 (ENTO-191NP)
Firebrat - Thysanura: Lepismatidae May 13, 2011 3104-1578
Fungus Gnats Mar 16, 2016 3104-1579 (ENTO-201NP)
House Fly Maggot - Diptera: Muscidae May 13, 2011 3104-1580
Lace Bugs - Hemiptera: Tingidae Mar 17, 2016 3104-1581 (ENTO-204NP)
Indian Meal Moth Mar 17, 2016 3104-1582 (ENTO-203NP)
Obscure Scale
Heavily infested trees will have large numbers of scales on twigs and branches. Scales may also be found on exposed roots and on the trunk of young trees. Scale insects feed on plant sap with their long thread-like mouthparts (stylets), which are several times longer than the insect itself.
Mar 24, 2016 3104-1583 (ENTO-206NP)
Wheel Bug Apr 15, 2016 3104-1585 (ENTO-211NP)
Wolf Spiders and Fishing Spiders Mar 29, 2016 3104-1586 (ENTO-212NP)
Yellow Ants Apr 15, 2016 3104-1587 (ENTO-213NP)
Carpet Beetles Mar 4, 2016 3104-1588 (ENTO-189P)
Wireworm control experiment in potatoes in Abingdon, VA in 2011 Nov 3, 2011 3110-1596
Living Well Newsletter, Volume 7, Issue 2 Apr 23, 2013 370-108
Droplet Chart / Selection Guide
When choosing nozzles/droplet sizes for spray applications, applicators must consider both coverage needed and drift potential. As a rule, smaller droplets provide better coverage, but larger droplets are less likely to drift.
Sep 25, 2014 442-031 (BSE-149P)
Nozzles: Selection and Sizing
This fact sheet covers nozzle description, recommended use for common nozzle types, and orifice sizing for agricultural and turf sprayers. Proper selection of a nozzle type and size is essential for correct and accurate pesticide application. The nozzle is a major factor in determining the amount of spray applied to an area, uniformity of application, coverage obtained on the target surface, and amount of potential drift.
Jan 31, 2014 442-032 (BSE-103P)
Pepper Maggot in Sweet (Bell) Pepper May 1, 2009 444-005
European Corn Borer in Sweet (Bell) Pepper May 1, 2009 444-006
Diamondback Moth in Virginia May 1, 2009 444-007
Bean Leaf Beetle Biology and Management in Snap Beans May 1, 2009 444-009
Colorado Potato Beetle May 1, 2009 444-012
Fall Armyworm in Vegetable Crops May 1, 2009 444-015
Aphids in Virginia Small Grains: Life Cycles, Damage and Control
Four species of aphids attack small grains in Virginia — greenbug, corn leaf aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid, and English grain aphid. In general, these aphids are small pear-shaped insects (1/16 to 1/8 inch long) that are green to nearly black, or sometimes pinkish in color. Immature aphids look just like adults except smaller. Both winged and wing-less forms can occur in the same colony. All grain aphids have a pair of conicles, tailpipe-like projections, on the top side of the tail end. Aphids feed singly or in colonies on upper and lower leaf surfaces and stems. They feed near plant bases when plants are young or during cold weather, and on upper-canopy leaves, stems, and even grain heads later in the season.
Nov 13, 2014 444-018
Winter Grain Mite
The adult is relatively large compared to other spider mites and is the only mite of economic importance with the anal pore (a tan to orange spot best seen with microscope, but can be seen with a hand lens) on the upper surface of the abdomen.
Nov 13, 2014 444-037
Bluegrass Billbug Pest Management in Orchardgrass Jul 1, 2010 444-040
Hunting Billbug Pest Management in Orchardgrass Jul 1, 2010 444-041
Sampling Methods for Varroa Mites on the Domesticated Honeybee May 1, 2009 444-103
Japanese Beetle in Field Corn May 1, 2009 444-106
Root-knot Nematode in Field Corn May 1, 2009 444-107
Asiatic Garden Beetle in Field Corn May 1, 2009 444-108
Slugs in Field Corn May 1, 2009 444-109
Insect Identification and Diagnosis Request May 19, 2016 444-113 (ENTO-196NP)
Integrated Pest Management Peanut Scouting Manual
In the competitive global peanut market, you need to lower production costs. At the same time, you also need to keep pesticide residues in peanuts to a minimum; protect rivers, streams, and lakes from runoff; and prevent chemicals from leaching through the soil to groundwater. Using IPM to protect crops only from pests that are likely to cause economic losses is a good way to meet these goals.
Nov 13, 2014 444-126
Identifying Soybean Fields at Risk to Leaf-Feeding Insects May 1, 2009 444-203
Cabbage and Seedcorn Maggot May 1, 2009 444-231
European Corn Borer May 1, 2009 444-232
Cereal Leaf Beetle, Biology and Management
Cereal leaf beetle, a native to Europe and Asia, was first detected in Michigan in 1962. Since that time it has spread throughout most of the mid-western and eastern United States and has become a significant pest of Virginia and North Carolina small grains. This insect can become very numerous in small grain fields and the larvae are capable of reducing grain yield by eating the green leaf tissue.
Nov 13, 2014 444-350
The Peanut Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory
The southern corn rootworm (SCR) has long been considered a major pest of peanuts in North Carolina and Virginia. However, researchers and Extension faculty at Virginia Tech and NC State have determined through more than 400 commercial field trials that the majority of peanut fields do not need to be treated. They have developed and tested a simple-to-use advisory that identifies those fields not at risk for pod damage or economic loss. The Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory can save you time and money as well as help you use insecticides more efficiently.
Nov 13, 2014 444-351
Field Guide to Stink Bugs
Field Guide to Stink Bugs of Agricultural Importance in the United States
Nov 17, 2014 444-356 (ENTO-68)
Second Edition Mid-Atlantic Guide to the Insect Pests and Beneficials of Corn, Soybean, and Small Grains Oct 4, 2012 444-360
Managing Stink Bugs in Cotton: Research in the Southeast Region Sep 23, 2009 444-390
Using Pitfall Traps to Monitor Insect Activity May 1, 2009 444-416
Asparagus Beetles May 1, 2009 444-620
Stink Bugs May 1, 2009 444-621
Corn Earworm Biology and Management in Soybeans
Corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, is the most common and destructive insect pest of soybeans grown in Virginia. Although infestation severity varies, about one-third of our acreage is treated annually. This costs farmers 1.5 to 2 million dollars annually, and requires the application of many pounds of insecticide to crop lands. We may never eliminate this pest from Virginia soybeans, but knowledge of the biology and use of best management practices can help limit insecticide controls to those fields that meet economic threshold criteria. This publication provides current information on corn earworm biology, prediction of outbreaks, pest advisories, scouting procedures, and recently revised economic thresholds.
Nov 13, 2014 444-770
Pest Management Guide: Field Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-016 (ENTO-221P)
Pest Management Guide: Horticultural and Forest Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-017 (ENTO-222P)
Pest Management Guide: Home Grounds and Animals, 2017
This 2017 Virginia Pest Management Guide provides the latest recommendations for controlling diseases, insects, and weeds for home grounds and animals. The chemical controls in this guide are based on the latest pesticide label information at the time of writing. Because pesticide labels change, read the label directions carefully before buying and using any pesticide. Regardless of the information provided here, always follow the latest product label instructions when using any pesticide.
Mar 15, 2017 456-018 (ENTO-220P)
IMPACT: Virginia Potato Disease Advisory Impact
Potatoes are a major food crop on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, with average annual cash receipts of $14 million (2011-13).
Nov 13, 2014 ANR-105P
IMPACT: Virginia Winter Fruit School Impact
Tree fruits are important to the agricultural economy in Virginia. The commonwealth ranks sixth in the nation in apple production, with a crop valued at more than $68 million, and 20th in peach production, with a crop valued at $4.5 million. Although smaller in acreage, cherries, pears, and plums also play an important role in some areas of Virginia. These fruit crops are susceptible to an everchanging array of insects, plant diseases, and weeds, and pest management programs are complex and knowledge-intensive.
May 13, 2015 AREC-135NP
Biology and Management of Hessian Fly in the Southeast Feb 27, 2013 AREC-39P (ANR-1069)
2013 Insect Pest Management In Virginia Cotton, Peanut, Soybean, and Sorghum Dec 10, 2013 AREC-61NP
Soybean Insect Guide
Numerous kinds of insects can be found in soybeans. Most are beneficial or harmless, but some can cause yield loss and even crop failure if not controlled.
Feb 7, 2014 AREC-68NP
Arthropod Pest Management Research on Vegetables in Virginia – 2011
This booklet summarizes more than 50 experiments of arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in Virginia in 2011. Experiments were primarily conducted at three Virginia Tech research stations: the Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center (ESAREC) near Painter, VA, the Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center (HRAREC) in Virginia Beach, VA and the Kentland Research Farm near Blacksburg, VA. All plots were maintained according to standard commercial practices.
Feb 1, 2012 ENTO-1
2014 Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton and Peanut Feb 9, 2015 ENTO-109NP
Sugarcane beetle in corn Jun 28, 2012 ENTO-13NP
Non-Chemical Bed Bug Management
Bed bugs have proven to be a very challenging pest. While most people would like to have a pest management professional come to their home and spray a magic potion that eliminates bed bugs forever, no such potion exists. Bed bugs are highly resistant to a number of insecticides and their eggs are impervious to most insecticide formulations.
Apr 29, 2015 ENTO-130NP
Florida Predatory Stink Bug
The Florida predatory stink bug (FPSB) is a native stink bug species in the southeastern United States. It predominately occurs in neotropical regions, but can be found as far north as Pennsylvania. This species is a natural enemy that feeds on a variety of insects including many agricultural pests (Figs. 1 & 2).
Jun 5, 2015 ENTO-131NP
Banded Ash Borer
Adult banded ash borers have somewhat cylindrical, elongated bodies ranging from 8–18 mm (0.3–0.7 inches) long and tapered towards the tip of the abdomen. Adults are grayish-black in color with lighter colored hairs all over the body. There is a yellow band on the leading edge of the thorax directly behind the head and several yellow bands across the wing covers.
May 19, 2015 ENTO-133NP
Blow Flies
Adult blow flies are generally medium to large, robust flies. They vary in length, with the largest species measuring about 16 mm (0.6 inches) long.
May 19, 2015 ENTO-134NP
Brown Recluse Spider
Brown recluse spiders belong to a group of spiders commonly known as violin spiders or fiddlebacks. Their name refers to a characteristic fiddle-shaped pattern on their head region directly behind their eyes (never on the abdomen). Brown recluse spiders range in color from tan to dark brown, but often they are a golden brown.
May 19, 2015 ENTO-135NP
Cluster Fly
Adult cluster flies are medium-sized, robust, somewhat bristly flies about 7 mm (0.3 inches) long.
May 19, 2015 ENTO-136NP
House fly
Adult house flies are medium-sized flies about 6 mm (0.25 inch) long. They are grayish-black in color, with 4 dark bands running the length of the thorax and conspicuous bristles on the body.
May 19, 2015 ENTO-137NP
Imported Willow Leaf Beetle
Imported willow leaf beetle was identified in the United States in 1915. It likely arrived on landscape plants shipped from Europe, where it is native.
May 20, 2015 ENTO-139NP
Iris Borer
Adult iris borers are stout, medium sized moths with a wingspan of 3.8–5 cm (1.5–2 inches). The head and forewings are covered with purplish brown scales and the hind wings are yellowish. The forewings have thin dark zigzag lines, a more conspicuous dark kidney-shaped spot, and variable sooty shading around the margins
May 20, 2015 ENTO-140NP
Locust Borer, Megacyllene robiniae (Forst.) Coleoptera: Cerambycidae
The locust borer is a native insect that attacks black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) and its ornamental cultivars. Adult locust borers are conspicuous black and yellow beetles with long black antennae and reddish legs. There is a yellow W-shaped band across the wing covers with other yellow stripes.
May 8, 2015 ENTO-141NP
Redheaded Ash Borer
Adult redheaded ash borers have somewhat cylindrical, elongated bodies ranging from 4–13 mm (0.16–0.5 inches) long and tapered towards the tip of the abdomen. The head, thorax and legs are reddish brown and there are four yellow dorsal bands on the darker wing covers.
May 7, 2015 ENTO-142NP
Psocids: Barklice and Booklice
Psocids are small, oval insects with soft bodies that usually measure only several millimeters long. A psocid measuring 6 mm (0.25 inches) long is rather large for this group of insects. Psocids generally occur in shades of brown, black, or pale colors; some have distinctive mottled or striped markings.
May 7, 2015 ENTO-143NP
Galls made by Wasps
Gall wasps attack primarily oak trees, and are found on roots, flowers, and acorns, but especially the leaves and twigs. Roses and brambles (blackberries and raspberries) also are attacked by gall wasps. These insects have complicated life cycles, and the galls they produce occur in an endless variety of shapes and colors. In some species, alternate generations produce distinctly different galls.
May 14, 2015 ENTO-145NP
Galls made by aphids, adelgids, phylloxerans, psyllids, and midges
Galls made by made by aphids, adelgids, phylloxerans, psyllids, and midges occur on many different plants. Galls are abnormal growths of plant tissue induced by insects and other organisms. Gall-making parasites release growth-regulating chemicals as they feed, causing adjacent plant tissues to form a gall. The parasite then develops within the relative security of the gall. Most are harmless to trees, but a few are pests.
May 8, 2015 ENTO-146NP
Galls and Rust made by Mites
Galls are abnormal growths of plant tissue induced by insects and other organisms. Gall-making parasites release growth-regulating chemicals as they feed, causing adjacent plant tissues to form a gall. The parasite then develops within the relative security of the gall. Galls come in an endless variety of forms. Many are strikingly colored or curiously shaped. Each gall-making species causes a gall structurally different from all others. By noting the type of host plant and the structure of the gall, one can identify the gall-making mite without actually seeing it.
May 8, 2015 ENTO-147NP
Native and Solitary Bees In Virginia
Although honey bees are well known for pollination and honey production, other bees at times impact humans in various ways. These native bees range from beneficial to annoying, sometimes at the same time. Native bees are important pollinators for fruit and vegetables.
May 8, 2015 ENTO-151NP
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Biology And Management In Mid-Atlantic Soybeans
The mission of the Delaware Soybean Board (DSB), Maryland Soybean Board (MSB), and Virginia Soybean Board (VSB) is to maximize the profitability of soybean producers in their respective states by investing soybean checkoff funds in targeted domestic and international research, promotion and communication initiatives. The volunteer farmer- leaders who serve on the DSB, MSB and VSB boards of directors invest your checkoff dollars in research to improve soybean production practices to make your farm more profitable and ensure the sustainability of Mid-Atlantic soybean production.
Nov 5, 2015 ENTO-168NP
Pediobius foveolatus – A parasitoid of the Mexican bean beetle
Pediobius foveolatus, is a tiny exotic parasitoid wasp that is used as a biological control agent for Mexican bean beetle, an important defoliating pest of beans in Virginia.
Sep 24, 2015 ENTO-170NP
Cerceris fumipennis “The Smokey Winged Beetle Bandit”
Cerceris fumipennis is a solitary digger wasp (crabronid) native to eastern North America. It is a predator almost exclusively of adult beetles of the family Buprestidae. This wasp gathers many species of native metallic wood-boring beetles, as well as the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (EAB).
Sep 24, 2015 ENTO-171NP
Yellow Poplar Weevil
Rice-shaped holes about 1/16 inches result from adult feeding. Larval feeding forms mines, usually two per leaf. If they are both on the same side of midrib, one is extensive, and the other dwarfed. If the insect lays eggs on opposite sides of the midrib, both mines develop normally.
Nov 6, 2015 ENTO-172NP
Diagnosing stink bug injury to vegetables
In the mid-Atlantic U.S. vegetable crops are attacked by several different stink bug species (1). The primary pest species include: the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, which has become the dominant species in most landscapes (2), brown stink bug, Euschistus servus Say, which is the most common species attacking tomatoes; green stink bug, Chinavia hilaris Say (3); and harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica, which is primarilly a pest of brassica vegetables only (4). All stink bugs are piercing sucking feeders that insert their stylets into the fruit, pods, buds, leaves, and stems of plants.
Nov 13, 2015 ENTO-173NP
Benefits of an Insecticide Seed Treatment for Pumpkin Production in Virginia
In recent years cucurbit growers in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. could purchase their seeds pre-treated with the neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam. The insecticide seed treatment is currently packaged as FarMore F1400, which also includes three proven and complementary fungicides that provide the first line of defense against several key seed and seedling diseases including Rhizoctonia, Fusarium, Pythium, general damping-off and seedling blight.
Dec 21, 2015 ENTO-174NP
Summary of insecticide efficacy for control of wireworms on potatoes – Virginia (2003-2015)
Wireworms are the subterranean larval stage of click beetles. These insects can remain in the soil for several years attacking potato seed pieces or tubers or seeds and roots of other crops that are planted in the field.
Dec 23, 2015 ENTO-176NP
Control of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug with Insecticide-Treated Window Screens
In Virginia and other Mid-Atlantic states, the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) has become a serious nuisance pest (Rice et al. 2014). Each fall, these insects aggregate on buildings seeking shelters in which to spend the winter months.
Jan 26, 2016 ENTO-177NP
Evaluation of the Residual Efficacy of Commercial Slug Baits
Slugs are prevalent pests in no-till and reduced-till crop systems in Virginia. These slimy mollusks utilize plant residue to hide during the day, and at night, they feed on numerous crops causing irregular feeding holes and shredded leaves. Slugs cause the most damage during early plant growth.
Jan 29, 2016 ENTO-178NP
Buck Moth Oct 8, 2012 ENTO-18NP
Spotted Lanternfly
The spotted lanternfly (SLF) originates from China where its presence has been documented in detail dating as far back as the 12th century.
Feb 3, 2016 ENTO-180NP
Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean 2015 Mar 8, 2016 ENTO-184NP
Hag Moth Caterpillar Oct 9, 2012 ENTO-19NP
Hickory Horned Devil Oct 9, 2012 ENTO-20NP
Mosquitos and their Control
The key to controlling mosquitoes is removing the standing or stagnant water where they live.
Mar 11, 2016 ENTO-202NP
Velvet Ants Oct 9, 2012 ENTO-22NP
Fall cankerworm: Alsophila pometaria
Cankerworms are also known as inchworms, loop worms, and spanworms - this is credited to their distinctive way of moving. In order to travel, a cankerworm must grab leaves or branches with its front legs and then pull the rest of its body forward. This causes the abdomen area to contract and gives the worm the appearance of arching its back.
Aug 5, 2016 ENTO-223NP
Insecticide and Acaricide Research on Vegetables in Virginia 2016
This booklet contains arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in eastern Virginia in 2016. Research was conducted at several locations in Virginia including: 1) the Virginia Tech Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center (AREC) near Painter, VA.
Dec 14, 2016 ENTO-229NP
Springtails Oct 9, 2012 ENTO-23NP
Insect Identification Laboratory Annual Report 2016 Mar 7, 2017 ENTO-233
Silverfish and Firebrats Oct 9, 2012 ENTO-24NP
Performance of Insecticides on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug on Vegetables Dec 14, 2012 ENTO-28NP
Asian Needle Ant Jan 7, 2013 ENTO-29NP
Insect Identification Lab
Welcome to the Insect Identification Laboratory at Virginia Tech. The Insect Identification Lab covers all insects found in all situations and commodities in Virginia. This diagnostic lab started in 1967 and is a service for Extension Agents and Citizens of Virginia.
Sep 25, 2013 ENTO-45NP
Green Stink Bug
Green stink bug, Chinavia halaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare) (Say), is a highly polyphagous pest of many crops throughout Virginia including soybean, tomato, pepper, snapbean, okra, and tree fruit and nut crops. They are often confused with southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.) because of their similar green coloring and habitat during the growing season, but can be properly separated by identifying the elongated scent canal on the ventral side of the metathorax. They can also be distinguished from the shape of their abdominal spine with the green stink bug having a more pointed spine at the base of the hind legs instead of the rounded spine on the southern green stink bug. Also, southern green stink bug is rarely found in Virginia.
Apr 11, 2014 ENTO-67NP
Beet Webworms
Both Hawaiian beet webworm (HBW) and beet webworm (BW) have multiple generations per year, and the total number is based on temperature. In tropical and subtropical climates, HBW is active year round, and can complete a generation in about 30 days. The species cannot overwinter in Virginia, but can migrate northward during the season to become a pest in late summer and early fall. BW is found throughout the U.S., but is more common in the western states. This species has fewer generations per year and can overwinter in the soil as a mature larva.
Sep 1, 2014 ENTO-77NP
Emerald Ash Borer
The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is a wood-boring beetle native to eastern Asia and is now considered the most destructive forest pest ever seen in North America. Since its discovery in Michigan in 2002, it has killed tens of millions of native ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the United States and Canada. This destruction has already cost municipalities, property owners, and businesses tens of millions of dollars in damages.
Feb 7, 2014 HORT-69NP
Pesticide Applicator Manuals Nov 17, 2011 VTTP-2
Virginia Tech Pesticide Programs May 11, 2009 vtpp-1