Resources for Plant Diseases

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Applied Research on Field Crop Disease Control 2007 May 1, 2009 2808-1005
Fusarium Wilt of Mimosa (Albizia julibrissin)
Fusarium wilt is a common and lethal disease of mimosa (Albizia julibrissin)1, also commonly known as silktree. In the United States this disease occurs in the east from New York southward and also in Louisiana, Arkansas and California. Fusarium wilt is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis perniciosum. Albizia spp. are the only known host of F. oxysporum'' f.sp. ''perniciosum''. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. perniciosum colonizes and clogs the tree’s vascular (water-conducting) tissue, and interferes with the movement of plant sap. This results in relatively rapid tree death.
Jan 20, 2015 2811-1020(PPWS-53NP)
Applied Research on Field Crop Disease Control 2008 May 14, 2009 2905-1294
Downy Mildew in Cucurbits: Occurence of QOI Resistance in the USA and Impact on Managing Disease Aug 12, 2009 2906-1385
Use of In-furrow Fungicide Treatments and Seedpiece Dusts for Disease Control in White Potato Aug 18, 2009 2906-1394
Bacterial Leaf Scorch of Landscape Trees Jan 11, 2010 3001-1433
Common Diseases of Soybean in the Mid-Atlantic Region Feb 17, 2010 3001-1435
Bean Pod Mottle Virus in Virginia Soybeans Sep 9, 2010 3009-1461
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2009 Dec 21, 2010 3012-1520
Managing Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains
Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, continues to impact small grain crops grown in Virginia. Caused primarily by the fungus Fusarium graminearum (also known as Gibberella zeae), this disease can negatively impact yield and grain quality.
Mar 4, 2011 3102-1535
Successful No-Tillage Corn Production Jul 29, 2009 424-030
Applied Research On Field Crop Disease Control 2006 Apr 28, 2009 424-236
Selected Vegetable Diseases Jul 2, 2015 426-363(HORT-179P)
Plant Disease Diagnostic Form
Plant Disease Diagnostic Form
May 13, 2016 450-097 (ENTO-198NP)
Problem-free Shrubs for Virginia Landscapes
The most effective form of plant disease control in the landscape is prevention. Disease prevention can be as simple as choosing the right plant for the right place at planting time. This fact sheet was developed as a guide to shrubs that generally experience few problems in Virginia landscapes. Using these species for new plantings should help you avoid troublesome disease and insect problems in your landscape.
Jun 27, 2016 450-236 (PPWS-69P)
Problem-free Trees for Virginia Landscapes
Many of the tree species commonly planted in Virginia landscapes suffer from disease problems. Although some diseases can be cured, most must be controlled on a preventative basis. The best option for new plantings is to choose species that have a low risk of developing disease. Listed below, in alphabetical order, are some choices of problem-free trees for Virginia landscapes.
Oct 19, 2016 450-237 (PPWS-70P)
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions I: Background and General Information May 1, 2009 450-301
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions II: Identification, Biology, and Ecology May 1, 2009 450-302
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions III: Control with Fungicides May 1, 2009 450-303
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions IV: Cropping Systems and Cultural Practices May 1, 2009 450-304
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions V: Monitoring, Tracking, and Scouting May 1, 2009 450-305
Soybean Disease Control: Response of Soybeans to Foliar Sprays of Fungicides in 2005 May 1, 2009 450-561
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Foliar Fungicides in 2006
The spread of soybean rust northward through states along the Atlantic Coast began on soybeans in Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. The disease was first reported in South Carolina on 21 August, North Carolina on 14 September, and Virginia on 9 October. The epidemic of 2006 was far reaching in that disease outbreaks occurred on soybeans as far north as Illinois and Indiana and east to Virginia
May 1, 2009 450-562
Applied Research On Field Crop Disease Control 2005 May 1, 2009 450-564-05
Applied Research On Field Crop Disease Control 2004 May 1, 2009 450-564
Comparison of Yield, Maturity, Value and Susceptibility to TSWV in Virginia- and Runner-type Varieties of Peanut in 2004 May 1, 2009 450-567
Iris Leaf Spot
Iris leaf spot (also called Heterosporium leaf spot) is the most common disease of iris in Virginia. It is caused by the fungus Cladosporium iridis (syn. Heterosporium iridis). Leaf spotting is most conspicuous on the upper half of the leaf following bloom. Although this pathogen is most common on bulbous iris, it can also cause severe damage to rhizomatous iris, and has also been reported on Gladiolus, Freesia and Narcissus species.
Nov 1, 2016 450-600 (PPWS-90NP)
Juniper Tip Blights Mar 30, 2017 450-601 (PPWS-91 NP)
Botrytis Blight of Peony
Botrytis blight is a common fungal disease that confronts the peony grower each spring. The fungus Botrytis cinerea blights stems, buds, and leaves and can cause plants to look unsightly, especially in wet springs. This fungus causes disease on a wide variety of herbaceous and woody ornamentals, as well as vegetables and small fruits. It is sometimes referred to as “gray mold” because of the conspicuous, fluffy, gray fungal growth that forms on infected plant parts.
Sep 26, 2016 450-602 (PPWS-93NP)
Powdery Mildew of Ornamental Plants
Powdery mildew fungi attack a variety of ornamental plants grown in Virginia.
May 1, 2009 450-603
Leaf and Flower Gall of Azalea and Camellia
Leaf and flower gall is a disease that is common on azaleas and camellias in the spring. The disease has also been reported on other members of the plant family Ericaceae. It occurs in home landscapes and nurseries, and is often seen on flame azaleas in the forest in the spring. The disease is caused by species of the fungus Exobasidium.
Oct 18, 2016 450-605 (PPWS-92NP)
Entomosporium Leaf Spot of Photinia
Photinia, a shrub belonging to the plant family Rosaceae, is a popular landscape shrub in the southeastern U.S. Several species are grown, but the most popular is the hybrid Photinia ×fraseri, or “redtip”, so named for its bright red, immature foliage. The biggest drawback to growing photinia is a leaf spot disease caused by the fungus Diplocarpon mespili (syn. Entomosporium mespili) to which redtip is highly susceptible.
Sep 30, 2016 450-609 (PPWS-82P)
Gray Leaf Spot Disease of Corn
Gray leaf spot disease of corn caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis, poses a serious threat to corn production in many areas of the eastern United States, including Virginia, and more recently in large areas of the U. S. Corn Belt
May 1, 2009 450-612
Rose Rosette Disease
Rose rosette disease (RRD), a disease believed to be caused by the recently identified Rose rosette virus, has been spreading through much of the wild rose population of the Midwestern, Southern, and Eastern United States for years.
Sep 17, 2012 450-620 (PPWS-10P)
Corn Smut
Common smut of corn is caused by the fungus Ustilago maydis. The fungus causes gall formation on all aboveground parts of corn plant
May 1, 2009 450-706
Anthracnose on Snap Beans
Anthracnose is a major disease of the common snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and can occur on other legumes. It is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. When environmental conditions are favorable, crop losses can be as high as 100 percent on susceptible cultivars of snap beans.
Jan 29, 2014 450-719 (PPWS-26NP)
Brown Rot on Peach and Other Stone Fruits
Brown rot is one of the most destructive diseases of peach and nectarine in Virginia, and also occurs on other stone fruits such as apricot, cherry, and plum. When environmental conditions favor this disease, crop loss can be devastating.
Mar 25, 2015 450-721 (PPWS-64P)
Reducing Pesticide Use in the Home Lawn and Garden
Pesticide use affects the quality of human health, the environment, and nontarget organisms in the ecosystem. Therefore, any pesticide application warrants a careful assessment of the expected benefits and risks. Too often, however, homeowners use pesticides inappropriately or without careful consideration of alternatives. This fact sheet outlines general pest control tactics that can easily be implemented for home lawns and gardens, along with other information that home owners can use to make sound pest management decisions. The intent is to ensure that homeowners are aware of alternative control tactics and pesticide characteristics, and that pesticides are used properly and only when necessary.
Apr 29, 2015 450-725 (PPWS-56P)
Botryosphaeria Canker and Dieback of Trees and Shrubs in the Landscape
Most trees and shrubs are susceptible to dieback and cankers caused by several species of the fungal genus Botryosphaeria. Botryosphaeria fungi are typically opportunistic pathogens. Opportunistic pathogens only cause disease on plants that are stressed. Therefore, avoiding plant stress, which predisposes plant tissue to infection and colonization by this fungal group, is the best strategy to prevent Botryosphaeria disease problems.
Mar 16, 2015 450-726 (PPWS-50)
Pest Management Guide: Field Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-016 (ENTO-221P)
Pest Management Guide: Horticultural and Forest Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-017 (ENTO-222P)
Virginia Master Naturalist, Basic Training Course, Botany
Plants can be defined as multicellular, photosynthetic organisms with reproductive structures that are more complex than single cells. By this definition, algae are not considered plants because they are either unicellular or their reproductive structures are essentially unicellular. Fungi, too, are excluded because they are not photosynthetic. At least 400 million years of diversification have resulted in a wide diversity of taxonomically distinct major groups of plants. Some of the most important groups of plants found in Virginia are described below.
Feb 6, 2014 ANR-10NP (ANR-97NP)
IMPACT: Virginia Potato Disease Advisory Impact
Potatoes are a major food crop on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, with average annual cash receipts of $14 million (2011-13).
Nov 13, 2014 ANR-105P
Virginia Master Naturalist, Basic Training Course, Botany (Introductory Version)
Plants can be defined as multicellular photosynthetic organisms with reproductive structures that are more complex than single cells. By this definition, algae are not considered plants because they are either unicellular or their reproductive structures are essentially unicellular, and fungi, too, are excluded because they are not photosynthetic.
Jan 31, 2014 ANR-12NP
Late Blight of Tomato and Potato Jan 20, 2012 ANR-6
Applied Research on Field Crop Disease Control 2011 Feb 1, 2012 AREC-12
Applied Research On Field Crop Disease Control 2014
The research described in this book was designed to evaluate strategies for improving disease control and the efficiency of crop production in Virginia. Commercial products are named for informational purposes only. Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Virginia State University do not advocate or warrant products named nor do they intend or imply discrimination against those not named.
Jan 26, 2015 AREC-126NP
Impact of Cotton Monoculture, Variety Selection, and Chemical Inputs on Disease Control, 2011 Jan 27, 2012 AREC-13
IMPACT: Virginia Winter Fruit School Impact
Tree fruits are important to the agricultural economy in Virginia. The commonwealth ranks sixth in the nation in apple production, with a crop valued at more than $68 million, and 20th in peach production, with a crop valued at $4.5 million. Although smaller in acreage, cherries, pears, and plums also play an important role in some areas of Virginia. These fruit crops are susceptible to an everchanging array of insects, plant diseases, and weeds, and pest management programs are complex and knowledge-intensive.
May 13, 2015 AREC-135NP
Applied Research on Field Crop Disease Control 2015 Apr 19, 2016 AREC-173NP
Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare, L.) Diseases Head mold Aug 21, 2012 AREC-20NP
Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare, L.) Insects Corn earworm [Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)] Aug 31, 2012 AREC-21NP
Troubleshooting The Soybean Crop Nov 16, 2012 AREC-25NP
Applied Research on Field Crop Disease Control 2013 Feb 1, 2012 AREC-12
Galls and Rust made by Mites
Galls are abnormal growths of plant tissue induced by insects and other organisms. Gall-making parasites release growth-regulating chemicals as they feed, causing adjacent plant tissues to form a gall. The parasite then develops within the relative security of the gall. Galls come in an endless variety of forms. Many are strikingly colored or curiously shaped. Each gall-making species causes a gall structurally different from all others. By noting the type of host plant and the structure of the gall, one can identify the gall-making mite without actually seeing it.
May 8, 2015 ENTO-147NP
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight in the Virginia Home Landscape: Version 2, September 2016
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations.
Sep 30, 2016 PPWS-29NP (PPWS-85NP)
Virginia Boxwood Blight Task Force
To provide leadership in safeguarding and protecting the ornamental horticulture industry, historical gardens and landscape plantings from boxwood blight.
May 20, 2014 PPWS-30
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight: Best management practices for boxwood blight in Virginia production nurseries WITH boxwood blight Version 2, September 2016
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations.
Sep 30, 2016 PPWS-32NP (PPWS-87NP)
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight in Virginia Production Nurseries WITHOUT Boxwood Blight Version 2, September 2016
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations.
Sep 30, 2016 PPWS-33NP (PPWS-86NP)
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight: Best management practices for Virginia retail nurseries WITH boxwood blight Version 2, August 2016
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations.
Sep 30, 2016 PPWS-34NP (PPWS-89NP)
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight: Best management practices for Virginia retail nurseries WITHOUT boxwood blight Version 2, September 2016
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations.
Sep 30, 2016 PPWS-35NP (PPWS-88NP)
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight for Greenery Producers
Best management practices for boxwood blight (also called “box blight”) for greenery producers are practices recommended to avoid the introduction and spread of boxwood blight, caused by the fungus Calonectria pseudonaviculata (syn. Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum). The recommendations in this document are designed to avoid spread of boxwood blight within a planting or to new locations when pruned tips are collected, sold and/or used for holiday greenery1. These recommendations are relevant to anyone involved in the greenery (“tipping”) industry, including small and large-scale greenery producers, home growers who sell boxwood tips, and people who tip-prune boxwood on other people’s property. Care must be taken at all levels of greenery production to prevent the spread of the boxwood blight pathogen and avoid economic losses associated with this disease.
Oct 13, 2016 PPWS-39NP (PPWS-95NP)
Boxwood Blight: A New Disease of Boxwood Found in the Eastern U.S. Jan 5, 2012 PPWS-4
Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight for Professionally Managed Landscapes and Public and Historic Gardens in Virginia
Boxwood blight is caused by the fungal pathogen Calonectria pseudonaviculata (syn. Cylindrocladium buxicola). Boxwood blight was first described in the United Kingdom in the mid-1990’s and by 2002 was found in several other European countries and New Zealand. In September 2011 boxwood blight was discovered in North America. Symptoms of the disease include leaf spotting (Fig. 1), elongate, dark cankers on stems (Fig. 2), defoliation, and dieback (Fig. 3). The primary means by which the disease spreads is the inadvertent introduction of infected boxwood to existing plantings. The pathogen can also spread by spores, which readily adhere to equipment and work clothes, and by microsclerotia, which survive in infested soil and plant debris. This document outlines best management practices for landscapers and property managers to reduce the risk of spreading boxwood blight to landscapes and public and historic gardens, and to manage the disease if it is introduced.
Sep 26, 2016 PPWS-49NP (PPWS-84NP)