Resources for Pasture & Forage - Crops & Soils

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
2009-2010 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in the Virginia‐Carolina Region Jan 25, 2011 3101-1531
Warm-Season Annual Grasses for Summer Forage May 1, 2009 418-004
Managing Virginia's Steep Pastures May 1, 2009 418-005
No-Till Seeding of Forage Grasses and Legumes May 1, 2009 418-007
Controlled Grazing of Virginia's Pastures May 1, 2009 418-012
Planting and Managing Switchgrass for Forage, Wildlife, and Conservation May 1, 2009 418-013
Establishing and Managing Caucasian Bluestem May 1, 2009 418-014
The Virginia Alfalfa Variety Report: A Five-year Summary (1999 - 2003) May 1, 2009 418-018
Winter Seeding Methods to Establish Clover in Permanent Pasture Jun 10, 2010 418-022
Making the Most of Tall Fescue in Virginia May 1, 2009 418-050
Forage Establishment: Getting Off to a Good Start May 1, 2009 418-120
Calibrating Forage Seeding Equipment Dec 10, 2009 418-121
Putting the Punch Back in Your Pastures: Pasture Renovation May 1, 2009 418-134
Fertilizing Cool-Season Forages with Poultry Litter versus Commercial Fertilizer Sep 16, 2009 418-142
The Nutritive Value of Common Pasture Weeds and Their Relation to Livestock Nutrient Requirements Aug 6, 2009 418-150
Herbage Quality, Biomass, and Animal Performance of Cattle Grazing. Part I: Forage Biomass, Botanical Composition, and Nutritive Values Nov 19, 2009 418-151
Herbage Quality, Biomass, and Animal Performance of Cattle Grazing. Part II: Animal Performance Nov 19, 2009 418-152
The Virginia Perennial Cool-Season Grass Forage Variety Report: A 3-Year Summary (2002-2004) May 1, 2009 418-200
Growing Small Grains for Forage in Virginia May 1, 2009 424-006
Agronomy Handbook, 2000 May 1, 2009 424-100
'Matua' Prairie Grass - Bromus wildenowii May 1, 2009 424-700
Control of Common Pasture and Hayfield Weeds in Virginia and West Virginia May 1, 2009 427-002
Determining Forage Moisture Concentration May 1, 2009 442-106
Planning Fencing Systems For Controlled Grazing May 1, 2009 442-130
Management Tips for Round Bale Hay Harvesting, Moving, and Storage
Hay production and feeding is one of the most expensive components of forage-livestock systems. Specific management practices are necessary to maintain hay quality and minimize hay loss during harvest, transportation and storage of large round bales.
Oct 9, 2014 442-454 (BSE-173P)
Large Round Bale Safety
This Extension publication covers the safety aspects of equipment used in large round bale packages such as: balers, front-end loaders, bale handling and transport devices. The key to safe and efficient systems for handling large round bales is an operator who knows the hazards involved and who follows safety practices that can prevent accidents. Operators must be constantly alert for situations that may cause injuries to themselves or others. Besides pain and suffering, accidents contribute to higher costs in terms of unnecessary downtime or costly machine repairs. Alertness and safety consciousness can result in more efficient and profitable baling and handling.
Oct 13, 2014 442-455 (BSE-172P)
Soil Test Note #1 - Explanation of Soil Tests
The accompanying Soil Test Report will help you assess your plant's need for fertilizer and lime.
May 1, 2009 452-701
Soil Test Note #2 - Field Crops
Most Virginia soils are acidic and require lime applications at three- to five-year intervals. Maintaining the correct soil pH has several benefits, such as encouraging healthy root development and making sure nutrients in the soil are available to the plant. For example, low pH can cause aluminum toxicity and can decrease phosphorus availability.
Sep 25, 2014 452-702 (CSES-100P)
Soil Test Note No.3 - Liming and Fertilization of Cool-Season Forage Crops Aug 28, 2012 452-703 (CSES-16P)
Soil Test Note #4 - Trace Elements May 1, 2009 452-704
Soil Test Note 5: Fertilizing With Manures Aug 19, 2009 452-705
Powell River Project - Revegetation Species and Practices Jul 28, 2010 460-122
2012 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in Virginia Nov 26, 2012 AREC-30NP
Soybean Reproductive Development Stages
Remove the soybean plant at ground level to make it easier to stage. Examine each main stem node one at a time to determine the development stage. Focus on the top four nodes that contain fully developed leaves (shown below). A fully developed leaf is one that is located immediately below a node containing a leaf with unrolled or unfolded leaflets (leaflet edges are no longer touching). The soybean crop is considered to be at a particular stage when 50% of the plants reach that stage. Listed with stage description for R1 through R6 are the approximate number of days to R7, or physiological maturity, for full season (FS) soybean planted in May and double crop (DC) soybean planted in June/July.
Nov 25, 2013 AREC-59NP
Manure Injection in No-Till and Pasture Systems Feb 27, 2013 CSES-22P
Determining Harvesting Time for Corn Silage May 5, 2016 DASC-82NP
Pesticide Applicator Manuals Nov 17, 2011 VTTP-2