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Henry P. Wilson

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
2009 Virginia Cotton Production Guide Oct 7, 2009 424-300
2010 Virginia Peanut Production Guide Dec 1, 2009 2810-1017
2011 Virginia Peanut Production Guide Jan 12, 2011 2810-1017
2013 Virginia Peanut Production Guide Feb 12, 2013 AREC-31NP
2014 Commercial Vegetable Production Recommendations Feb 19, 2014 456-420 (AREC-80NP)
Cotton Harvest Aid Selection and Application Timing May 1, 2009 424-201
Defoliating Cotton under Adverse Conditions: Drought-stress, Cool Temperatures, and Rank Growth

Modern chemical harvest aids are applied to induce leaf abscission, hasten mature-boll dehiscence, and inhibit regrowth (Gwathmey and Hayes 1997; Snipes and Cathey 1992). Their use can result in increased machine harvest efficiency and fewer lodged plants while reducing boll rot, the trash in seed cotton, and the time from defoliation to harvest (Benedict 1984). The challenge of using harvest aids is the inconsistent way cotton responds to them, making defoliation one of the most unpredictable management practices (Benedict 1984; Gwathmey and Hayes 1997).

May 1, 2009 427-208
Fine Tuning a Sprayer with "Ounce" Calibration Method

This extension publication discusses guidelines to quickly evaluate the performance of a sprayer. Sprayer calibration, nozzle discharge, spray pattern uniformity, speed checks, pump performance and plumbing arrangements are evaluated with minimal calculations.

Tractor-mounted, pull-type, pick-up-mounted and self-propelled sprayers are available from numerous sources. Rising chemical costs and new low rate chemicals are making accurate application more important than ever before. Proper calibration must be a primary management consideration whether one is a farmer or a custom applicator. Since most pesticides are applied with hydraulic sprayers, users should also know proper application methods, chemical effects on equipment, and correct cleaning and storage methods for hydraulic sprayers.

May 1, 2009 442-453
Palmer Amaranth Control in Cotton: 2008 & 2009 Efficacy Experiments Dec 22, 2009 2912-1428
Palmer Amaranth Control in Soybean: 2009 Efficacy Experiments Dec 22, 2009 2912-1429
Plumbing Systems of Agricultural Sprayers

The plumbing systems of agricultural sprayers are usually considered foolproof. Sprayer problems may occur if plumbing and/or modifications are improperly done or maintenance is ignored. Retrofitting, addition of electrical control systems, and replacement of pumps or nozzles require proper knowledge of the plumbing system and the implications of these changes to sprayer performance. Routine maintenance of the plumbing system is essential.

May 1, 2009 442-452
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Cotton

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per 30 foot of row can reduce cotton yield by 6 to 12%.

May 1, 2009 2805-1001
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Soybean

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. Four Palmer amaranth plants per 100 ft2 of row can reduce soybean yield by 12 to 17%.

May 1, 2009 2808-1006
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2010 Dec 10, 2009 2810-1019
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2011 Jan 12, 2011 2810-1019-11
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2012 Feb 1, 2012 AREC-8
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2013 Feb 6, 2013 AREC-33NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2014 Feb 7, 2014 AREC-62NP