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Wade E. Thomason

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
2004 Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials May 1, 2009 424-031-04
2005 Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials May 1, 2009 424-031-05
2007 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots May 1, 2009 424-038-07
2008 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots May 1, 2009 2812-1025
2009 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots

The research and demonstration plots discussed in this publication are a cooperative effort by thirteen Virginia Cooperative Extension Agents and Specialists, numerous producers, local soil and water conservation districts, and many members of the agribusiness community. The fieldwork and printing of this publication is mainly supported by the Virginia Corn Check-Off Fund through the Virginia Corn Board. Anyone who would like a copy should contact their local extension agent, who can request a copy from the Northumberland County Extension office.

Jan 27, 2010 3001-1434
2010 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots Dec 21, 2010 3012-1521
2011 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots (formerly VCE pub #3012-1521)

Corn hybrid selection is becoming increasingly challenging.  With more seed companies and more GMO options and seed treatment packages than ever before, it can be very difficult to decide which hybrids to plant.  We evaluated early season hybrids (107 day RM or less) and mid season hybrids (108-112 day RM) at 5 locations and full season hybrids (113 day RM or more) at 3 locations.  In a year where rainfall patterns in general favored later hybrids, across all locations the mid season and full season hybrids averaged 20 bushels per acre or more than the early season hybrids.  Corn producers should continue to plant hybrids across all maturity ranges as a method for spreading out risk to adverse weather.

Dec 9, 2011 ANR-2
2011 Virginia On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots

The demonstration and research plot results discussed in this publication are a cooperative effort by six Virginia Cooperative Extension agents, extension specialists from Virginia Tech, and an assistant professor at the Virginia State University School of Agriculture.  We are proud to present this year’s on-farm small grain plot work to you.  The 2010-11 small grain season resulted in some excellent yields as timely planting, timely rainfall, and a cool, relatively dry grain fill period were all very positive for the wheat and barley crops.  With July 2012 wheat futures prices currently trading over $7.00 per bushel, the outlook for the 2012 crop is good.  We hope the information in this publication will help farmers produce a profitable crop.

Aug 12, 2011 3108-1593
2012 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots Nov 29, 2012 ANR-31NP
2012 Virginia On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots

The demonstration and research plot results discussed in this publication are a cooperative effort by four Virginia Cooperative Extension agents, extension specialists from Virginia Tech, and an assistant professor at the Virginia State University School of Agriculture. We are proud to present this year’s on-farm small grain plot work to you. The 2011-12 small grain season was challenging. Wet conditions in the fall hampered planting and caused stand losses in some fields. Precipitation was well below normal and temperatures were well above normal for January through mid April. Dry conditions decreased tillering and overall growth of the crop. Widespread rainfall on April 22nd basically saved the crop. Some late season diseases developed in some fields. With July 2013 wheat futures prices currently trading over $8.00 per bushel, the outlook for the 2013 crop is very good. We hope the information in this publication will help farmers produce a profitable crop.

Jul 20, 2012 ANR-19NP
2013 Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots Dec 4, 2013 ANR-96NP
2013 Virginia On-Farm Wheat Test Plots Jul 31, 2013 ANR-78NP
2014 Virginia On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots

The demonstration and research plot results discussed in this publication are a cooperative effort by six Virginia Cooperative Extension agents, extension specialists from Virginia Tech, and an assistant professor at the Virginia State University School of Agriculture. We are proud to present this year’s onfarm small grain plot work to you. We hope the information in this publication will help farmers produce a profitable crop in 2015.

Aug 11, 2014 ANR-113NP
Corn Fertility Update – Spring 2010 Jun 11, 2010 3006-1448
Deep Tillage Prior to No-Till Corn: Research and Recommendations May 1, 2009 424-053
Growing Bread Wheat in the Mid-Atlantic Region

The more than 55 million people who live in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States want to purchase processed grain foods such as bread and other dough products made from hard, or bread, wheat. 

May 1, 2009 424-024
Growing Hulless Barley in the Mid-Atlantic May 1, 2009 424-022
Growing Small Grains for Forage in Virginia

Cereal crops are used throughout the world for livestock feed. When they are managed properly they provide excellent grazing and high-quality silage or hay.

May 1, 2009 424-006
Managing Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains

Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, continues to impact small grain crops grown in Virginia. Caused primarily by the fungus Fusarium graminearum (also known as Gibberella zeae), this disease can negatively impact yield and grain quality. Grain may also contain toxins (mycotoxins) produced by the fungus and reduce the price received for grain at local mills and elevators. Corn and small grain residues remaining in the field prior to small grain planting are known to provide a place for the fungus
to overwinter and proliferate during favorable environmental conditions.

Mar 4, 2011 3102-1535
No-Tillage Small Grain Production in Virginia May 1, 2009 424-005
Pop-up and/or Starter Fertilizers for Corn Mar 8, 2010 3002-1438
Precision Farming Tools: Soil Electrical Conductivity

Soil electrical conductivity (EC) is a measurement that correlates with soil properties that affect crop productivity, including soil texture, cation exchange capacity (CEC), drainage conditions, organic matter level, salinity, and subsoil characteristics. This publication discusses: 1) How, with field verification, soil EC can be related to specific soil properties that affect crop yield, such as topsoil depth, pH, salt concentrations, and available water-holding capacity; 2) Soil EC maps often visually correspond to patterns on yield maps and can help explain yield variation; and 3) Other uses of soil EC maps (Table 1), including developing management zones, guiding directed soil sampling, assigning variable rates of crop inputs, fine tuning NRCS soil maps, improving the placement and interpretation of on-farm tests, salinity diagnosis, and planning drainage remediation.

May 1, 2009 442-508
Precision Farming Tools: Variable-Rate Application

There are a number of questions that must be answered before establishing a site-specific crop management (SSCM) program. Many of these questions are economic, some are agronomic and environmental, and others are technology-related. This publication is intended to discuss variable-rate devices that are available, while providing an understanding of which technologies might best fit a cropping system and production management strategy.

Aug 1, 2011 442-505
Sensor-Based, Variable-Rate Nitrogen Applications in Virginia

Variable-rate applications (VRA) of nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a new option to assist producers with real-time fertilizer rate decisions. Two commercially available systems that allow variable-rate nitrogen applications are GreenSeeker (Trimble Navigation Limited; www. ntechindustries.com/greenseeker-home.html) and the OptRx Crop Sensor (Ag Leader Technology; www. agleader.com/products/directcommand/optrx/). A discussion of the science behind these systems, potential economic benefits, and other methodologies to make VRA is discussed in Virginia Cooperative Extension publication 442-505, “Precision Farming Tools: Variable-Rate Application” (Grisso et al. 2011). 

Aug 8, 2014 CSES-90P
Small Grain Forage Variety Testing, 2014 Jun 27, 2014 CSES-91NP
Small Grains In 2010 Aug 4, 2010 3007-1455
Small Grains In 2011

The following tables present results from barley and wheat varietal tests conducted in Virginia in
2009-2011. Small-grain cultivar performance tests are conducted each year in Virginia by the
Virginia Tech Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences and the Virginia
Agricultural Experiment Station. The tests provide information to assist Virginia Cooperative
Extension Service agents in formulating cultivar recommendations for small grain producers and
to companies developing cultivars and/or marketing seed within the state. Yield data are given
for individual locations and across locations and years; yield and other performance
characteristics are averaged over the number of locations indicated in parenthesis near the
column heading. Performance of a given variety often varies widely over locations and years
which makes multiple location-year averages a more reliable indication of expected performance
than data from a single year or location. Details about management practices for barley and
wheat are listed for each experimental location.

Jul 21, 2011 3007-1456
Small Grains in 2004 May 1, 2009 424-001-04
Small Grains in 2005 May 1, 2009 424-001-05
Small Grains in 2006 May 1, 2009 424-001-06
Small Grains in 2007 May 1, 2009 424-001-07
Small Grains in 2008 May 1, 2009 2808-1007
Small Grains in 2009 Aug 5, 2009 2908-1403
Small Grains in 2012 Jul 27, 2012 CSES-18NP
Small Grains in 2013 Aug 7, 2013 CSES-62NP
Small Grains in 2014 Aug 1, 2014 CSES-97NP
Soil Test Note #2 - Field Crops

Most Virginia soils are acidic and require lime applications at three- to five-year intervals. Maintaining the correct soil pH has several benefits, such as encouraging healthy root development and making sure nutrients in the soil are available to the plant. For example, low pH can cause aluminum toxicity and can decrease phosphorus availability. 

Sep 25, 2014 452-702 (CSES-100P)
Successful No-Tillage Corn Production Jul 29, 2009 424-030
The Virginia Perennial Cool-Season Grass Forage Variety Report: A 3-Year Summary (2002-2004)

Perennial cool-season forage grasses are the foundation of ruminant livestock production systems in Virginia. Sound management of these grasses begins with proper species and variety selection. This report is a summary of forage variety trials performed with perennial cool-season grasses at Virginia Tech Agricultural Research and Extension Centers (ARECs) from 2002 through 2004. It includes trials seeded at the Southern Piedmont AREC (SPAREC) at Blackstone and at the Tidewater AREC, Suffolk, September 2001 and harvested for three years (2002 through 2004) 

May 1, 2009 418-200
Tips for Profitable Variety Selection: How to Use Data From Different Types of Variety Trials

Selecting an appropriate, high-yielding variety is one of the most important management decisions that producers make. Yield potential is clearly important, but the decision is complicated by such factors as the cropping system, the need for disease resistance, end-use quality goals, year-to-year climatic variation, and the need to select multiple varieties in order to reduce risk by spreading out flowering and maturity dates.

Jul 29, 2011 424-040
Understanding Pre-harvest Sprouting of Wheat May 11, 2009 424-060
Using the Virginia Cooperative Extension Climate Analysis Web Tool to Better Manage and Predict Wheat Development

Wheat development is affected by nutrients, water, light, and other factors; but temperature consistently determines how quickly or slowly plants move ahead in forming leaves, roots, tillers, and grain heads. The plant's development stage at any point during the season is affected very predictably by how warm or cool the season has been up to that point. This knowledge, combined with educated guesses about how the rest of the growing season will progress, can be extremely valuable information to the grower, who can then make more informed management decisions to include predicting the maturity/harvest schedule.

May 1, 2009 424-004
Using the Virginia Cooperative Extension Climate Analysis Web Tool to Develop a Corn Planting Strategy

With adequate soil moisture, early-planted corn generally out yields late-planted corn due to its better use of sunlight during June and July. The goal for most producers is to plant as early as possible and still achieve rapid emergence and a good crop stand.

May 1, 2009 424-003
Using the Virginia Cooperative Extension Climate Analysis Web Tool to Monitor, Predict, and Manage Corn Development

How a corn crop develops is affected by many factors: fertilization, rainfall, sunny or cloudy weather, hybrid or maturity group, etc. But these factors generally play second fiddle to temperature in determining when a corn crop tassels or is ready to harvest. Many years of observation have shown that plant development at any point during the season is affected very predictably by how warm or cool the season has been to that point. This knowledge, combined with projections about the remainder of the growing season, can sometimes be used to make mid-season adjustments in management and to predict harvest schedules.

May 1, 2009 424-055
Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2006 May 1, 2009 424-031-06
Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2007 May 1, 2009 424-031-07
Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials in 2008 May 1, 2009 2812-1024
Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials in 2009 Dec 1, 2009 2911-1425
Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials in 2010

Background Information

Performance trials of commercial corn hybrids were conducted at six locations in Virginia in 2010. The Mt. Holly location consisted of both an irrigated and non-irrigated test. All locations were planted with a Wintersteiger PlotKing
2600. All locations were harvested with a Massey-Ferguson 8XP plot combine. The Blackstone site was abandoned due to drought stress. Yields have been adjusted to 15.5% moisture. Grain test weight, moisture, and plot grain weights were
measured with a GrainGauge® manufactured by HarvestMaster. A list of the companies participating in the trials is shown in the above table. All hybrids entered in the Virginia trials were those submitted by commercial companies. The locations at which particular hybrids were entered were specified by the company. Companies entering hybrids were charged a fee for each hybrid per location to support the Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials.

Nov 15, 2010 3011-1519
Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials in 2014 Nov 25, 2014 CSES-107NP
Virginia No-Till Fact Sheet Series Number Five - Understanding Ammonia Volatilization from Fertilizers Aug 27, 2009 2908-1404
Virginia No-Till Fact Sheet Series Number Six - Nitrogen Fertilizer Sources and Properties Aug 27, 2009 2908-1405
Virginia No-Till Fact Sheet Series Number Two: Nitrogen Fertilizer Injection in No-Till Systems Nov 16, 2010 3011-1516
Virginia On-Farm Corn Test Plots 2006 May 1, 2009 424-038-06
Virginia On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots, 2005 May 1, 2009 424-050
Virginia On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots, 2006 May 1, 2009 424-050-06
Virginia On-Farm Wheat Test Plots, 2007 May 1, 2009 424-050-07
Virginia Tech Corn Silage Testing 2014

Annual corn silage hybrid testing in Virginia. This report contains the results for performance trials from commercial corn hybrids produced for silage at four locations in Virginia in 2014 as well as two and three year average performance, when available.

Nov 18, 2014 CSES-106NP
Virginia Tech On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots - Eastern Virginia, August 2009

The demonstration and research plot results discussed in this publication are a cooperative effort by seven Virginia Cooperative Extension agents, several extension specialists from Virginia Tech, area
producers, and agribusinesses. We are proud to present this year’s on-farm wheat plot work to you. The 2008-09 wheat season was a tough one for producers. Below normal temperatures in the fall and winter
reduced tillering, and wet conditions in the spring delayed harvest and resulted in low quality and yields in many areas. With wheat prices down considerably and input costs relatively high, wheat producers
will need to really focus on maximum economic yields during 2009-10 to produce profitable wheat.

Aug 28, 2009 2908-1409
Virginia Tech On-Farm Small Grain Test Plots, Eastern Virginia, August 2010 Aug 19, 2010 3008-1457