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Alan McDaniel

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
Asparagus

 Asparagus is a perennial vegetable that will live from 12 to 15 years or longer. It is one of the most valuable of the early vegetables and is well adapted to freezer storage. During the harvest period (traditionally spring, but see below for summer harvest instructions), the spears develop daily from underground crowns. Asparagus does well where winters are cool and the soil occasionally freezes at least a few inches deep; it is considered very hardy.

Mar 6, 2015 426-401(HORT-152P)
Beans

Environmental Preferences

Light: sunny

Soil: well-drained

Fertility: medium rich

pH: 5.8 - 7.0

Temperature: warm (65 degrees - 80 degrees) except fava beans

Moisture: average

Apr 16, 2015 426-402 (HORT-145P)
Cole Crops or Brassicas

All of the following crops are members of the cabbage family. It is best not to plant cabbage family crops in the same spot year after year, since diseases and insect pests will build up. Rotate crops within your garden. 

Apr 21, 2015 426-403 (HORT-156P)
Cucumbers, Melons and Squash

Varieties include both the slicer or fresh salad type and the pickle type (which can also be used fresh); vined, dwarfvined and bush varieties; all female or all-female seedless (no pollination required); burpless; and, various mixtures of these characteristics. Disease resistance is available in many varieties.

Mar 16, 2015 426-406 (HORT-147P)
Fertilizing the Vegetable Garden

The amount of fertilizer to apply to a garden depends on the natural fertility of the soil, the amount of organic matter present, the type of fertilizer used, and the crop being grown. The best way to determine fertilizer needs is to have the soil tested. Soil testing is available through your local Extension agent, through private labs, and with soil test kits which can be purchased from garden shops and catalogs.

Apr 16, 2015 426-323 (HORT-144P)
Gardening & Your Health, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Gardening with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) can be very difficult, especially when a long day of shoveling, raking, or weed pulling leaves you with a painful or “tingling” hand or wrist. These aches and pains are often caused in part by improper techniques or tools used in gardening.

Mar 19, 2015 426-060(HORT-131P)
Leafy Green Vegetables

Lettuce, a cool-season vegetable crop, is one of the easiest to grow. Lettuce withstands light frost; however, sunlight and high summer temperatures usually cause seedstalk formation (bolting) and bitter flavor. Slow-bolting or heat-resistant varieties are available and are recommended for extending the lettuce-growing season.

Mar 16, 2015 426-408 (HORT-148P)
Mulches for the Home Vegetable Garden

Mulching is a practice adaptable to nearly all home gardens. To mulch is simply to cover the soil around plants with a protective material, organic or inorganic.

Mar 20, 2015 426-326(HORT-140P)
Onions, Garlic, and Shallots

Onions are often grouped according to taste. The two main types of onions are strong flavored (American) and mild (often called European). Each has three distinct colors, yellow, white, and red. In general, the American onion produces bulbs of smaller size, denser texture, stronger flavor, and better keeping quality than European types. Globe varieties tend to keep longer in storage.

Mar 16, 2015 426-411(HORT-143P)
Potatoes, Peppers and Eggplant

Environmental Preferences

LIGHT: Sunny.

SOIL: Well-drained with moderate organic matter.

FERTILITY: Medium-rich.

pH: 4.8 to 6.5

TEMPERATURE: Cool (55 TO 65°F).

MOISTURE: Uniform moisture, especially while tubers are developing.

Apr 16, 2015 426-413 (HORT-146P)
Root Crops Mar 5, 2015 426-422 (HORT-150P)
Season Extenders

To get the most out of a garden, you can extend the growing season by sheltering plants from cold weather both in early spring and during the fall. Very ambitious gardeners harvest greens and other cool-weather crops all winter by providing the right conditions. There are many ways to lengthen the growing season, and your choice depends on the amount of time and money you want to invest.

Apr 22, 2015 426-381 (HORT-159P)
Seed For The Garden

Choosing and purchasing vegetable seeds is one of the most enjoyable gardening pastimes. Thumbing through colorful catalogs and dreaming of the season¼s harvest is one way to make winter seem a little warmer. Seed purchased from a dependable seed company will provide a good start toward realizing that vision of bounty. Keep notes about the seeds you purchase - their germination qualities, vigor of plants, tendencies toward insects and disease, etc. From this information, you can determine whether one seed company is not meeting your needs, or whether the varieties you have chosen are unsuitable for your area or gardening style. For example, if powdery mildew is a big problem on squash family plants in your area, the next year, you may want to look for mildew-resistant varieties.

Apr 21, 2015 426-316 (HORT-153P)
Sweet Corn

Sweet corn varieties differ significantly in time to maturity and in quality; yellow, white, bi-color, standard, and extra-sweet varieties are available. Most varieties planted are hybrids which have been bred for greater vigor and higher yields. A continuous harvest can be planned by planting early, mid-season, and late-season varieties or by making successive plantings of the same variety every two weeks or when the last planting has three to four leaves (corn sown in early spring will take longer because of cool temperatures).

Mar 16, 2015 426-405 (HORT-151P)
Tomatoes

Tomatoes are valuable garden plants in that they require relatively little space for large production. Each standard tomato plant, properly cared for, yields 10 to 15 pounds or more of fruit.

Mar 17, 2015 426-418 (HORT-142P)
Weeds in the Home Vegetable Garden

The most common definition of a weed is a plant out of place. Many plants that are considered weeds in the vegetable garden are beneficial wildflowers in other settings. Some, such as the Venice mallow (or flower-of-an-hour), morning glory, and even thistles, have flowers that rival those intentionally planted in flower beds. Unfortunately, some of the plants, while attractive in the wild, are too aggressive for use in the home garden and can take over the landscape. Seeds of even very obnoxious wild flowers may be sold occasionally, so care must be used in the selection of wildflowers vs. weeds.

Apr 22, 2015 426-364 (HORT-157P)