Resources by Rory Maguire

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Virginia No-Till Fact Sheet Series Number Three: Manure Injection Nov 16, 2010 3011-1517
Fertilizing Cool-Season Forages with Poultry Litter versus Commercial Fertilizer Sep 16, 2009 418-142
Fertilizer Types and Calculating Application Rates Aug 4, 2009 424-035
Nitrogen Management for White Potato Production Sep 28, 2009 438-012
Nutrient Management for Small Farms Oct 8, 2010 442-305
Impact of Changing From Nitrogen- to Phosphorus-Based Manure Nutrient Management Plans Sep 16, 2009 442-310
Biochar in Agricultural Systems Aug 20, 2010 442-311
Soil Test Note #1 - Explanation of Soil Tests
The accompanying Soil Test Report will help you assess your plant's need for fertilizer and lime.
May 1, 2009 452-701
Soil Test Note #2 - Field Crops
Most Virginia soils are acidic and require lime applications at three- to five-year intervals. Maintaining the correct soil pH has several benefits, such as encouraging healthy root development and making sure nutrients in the soil are available to the plant. For example, low pH can cause aluminum toxicity and can decrease phosphorus availability.
Sep 25, 2014 452-702 (CSES-100P)
Soil Test Note No.3 - Liming and Fertilization of Cool-Season Forage Crops Aug 28, 2012 452-703 (CSES-16P)
Soil Test Note 5: Fertilizing With Manures Aug 19, 2009 452-705
Laboratory Procedures: Virginia Tech Soil Testing Laboratory
The procedures for soil analysis used in the Soil Testing Laboratory were established in the early 1950s A routine test, consisting of eleven separate analyses, is performed on all samples.
May 1, 2009 452-881
Manure Injection in No-Till and Pasture Systems Feb 27, 2013 CSES-22P
Importance of Farm Phosphorus Mass Balance and Management Options
Phosphorus is a naturally occurring element that is one of 16 elements essential for plant growth and animal health. Research has documented that applying phosphorus in fertilizers or manure increases crop growth and yield on soils that are below critical agronomic levels, as measured during routine soil testing. Although the economic benefits of phosphorus fertilization on crop production are well-documented, too much of a good thing can be detrimental to the environment. Excessive soil phosphorus is a potential threat to water quality.
Dec 19, 2014 CSES-98P