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Joyce Latimer

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
America's Anniversary Garden: A Statewide Corridor and Entrance Enhancement Program

In 2007, Virginia will mark the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, the first English settlement in the Americas. The 18-month-long commemoration begins in May 2006 and will feature educational programs, cultural events, fairs, and various live and broadcast entertainments sponsored by Virginia and cities and towns across the commonwealth. See the America's 400th Anniversary website at www.americasanniversary.com for information about this salute to America's birthplace.

Jul 23, 2015 426-211 (HORT-186P)
America's Anniversary Garden: Red, White, and Blue in Fall and Winter Gardens

Virginia Cooperative Extension developed the America’s Anniversary Garden to help individuals, communities, and groups commemorate America’s 400th anniversary with a signature landscape or garden. These signature gardens have red, white, and blue color schemes. Other VCE garden design, plant selection, plant installation, and maintenance publications for patriotic gardens are listed in the Resources section .

Apr 10, 2015 426-228(HORT-164P)
Applying Pesticides Safely

Proper use of pesticides is essential for your safety and for that of the environment. Pesticides must be used correctly to be effective.

Review the product label before each use. Be sure you have all the materials necessary for a safe and proper application. Check precautions label sites (e.g., types of plants or areas) and timing requirements such as days to harvest, temperature, and wind speed restrictions. Be sure you can indeed use this pesticide when and where you intend to!

May 1, 2009 426-710
Choosing Pesticides Wisely
Healthy plants are less susceptible to attack by pests, and good cultural practices can reduce pest outbreaks.

Do you really need a pesticide?

Before you purchase any pesticide, you should answer some important questions.
  • Is the damage actually caused by a pest? Could it be due to the weather or a cultural practice, such as overor underwatering, improper fertilization, or herbicide damage?
  • If it is a pest, what kind is it?
  • Are there nonchemical ways to control it? Is the damage severe enough to warrant chemical control?
  • Is pesticide use cost-effective? Or would the chemical treatment cost more than the plant is worth?
  • Can the pest be controlled by a chemical at this stage of its life cycle, or would application at a different time be more effective?
  • Do you have the equipment and skill to use the proper pesticide correctly?
May 1, 2009 426-706
Common Ground: Why Should University Faculty Partner with Virginia Cooperative Extension? Jul 10, 2013 VCE-129NP
Creating a Water-Wise Landscape
Water-wise landscape design and management focus on working with nature and natural forces (such as rainfall) to create an aesthetically pleasing, livable landscape, while using less water from the local supply.

Minimizing the need for watering in your landscape requires careful observation, planning, and common sense. Several principles for water-wise landscaping include choosing the best design and plants, preparing soils, and watering properly for efficient water use.

May 1, 2009 426-713
Dealing with the High Cost of Energy for Greenhouse Operations Jun 30, 2009 430-101
Farm Security - “Treat it Seriously” – Security for Plant Agriculture: Producer Response for Plant Diseases, Chemical Contamination, and Unauthorized Activity

Acts of terrorism have heightened our awareness of the need for security, both at home and on the farm or nursery. This publication and the checklist that accompanies it will help you be proactive with regard to farm security.

Mar 9, 2011 445-004
Groundwater Quality and the Use of Lawn and Garden Chemicals by Homeowners

The people of Virginia use nearly 400 million gallons of groundwater each day to meet industrial, agricultural, public, and private water demands. One-third of Virginia's citizens rely on groundwater as their primary source of fresh drinking water, and 80 percent of Virginians use groundwater to supply some or all of their daily water needs. Groundwater is an important resource, but it is a hidden one and, therefore, is often forgotten. In fact, until recent incidents of groundwater contamination, little attention was paid to the need to protect Virginia's groundwater.

May 1, 2009 426-059
Herb Culture and Use

Herbs have been used for seasoning, medicine, fragrance, and sorcery for thousands of years. Tarragon, rosemary, and thyme are among the most ancient of seasonings, yet there are few culinary achievements that can top good poultry roasted with these three herbs.

Nov 11, 2011 426-420
Impatiens Downy Mildew May 21, 2013 PPWS-19NP
Patriotic Gardens: Bulbs for a Red, White, and Blue Spring Garden

Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) developed the America’s Anniversary Garden™ to help individuals, communities, and groups commemorate America’s 400th Anniversary with a signature landscape or garden. These signature gardens have red, white, and blue color schemes. Although the commemoration has passed, this guide continues to be useful for creating a patriotic garden. This is the third in a series of VCE garden design, plant selection, plant installation, and maintenance publications for America’s Anniversary Garden™.

Apr 9, 2015 426-220(HORT-163P)
Patriotic Gardens: How to Plant a Red, White and Blue Garden

Virginia Cooperative Extension developed the America’s Anniversary Garden in 2007 to help individuals, communities, and groups mark America’s 400th Anniversary with a signature garden planting. The signature gardens have red, white, and blue color schemes. Although the commemoration has passed, this guide continues to be a useful guide for creating a patriotic garden. This publication is the first in a series of Virginia Cooperative Extension publications and support materials to guide gardeners - new and experienced - in developing their own patriotic gardens. 

Jul 17, 2015 426-210 (HORT-185)
Patriotic Gardens: Red, White, and Blue Native Plants

In 2007, Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) developed the America’s Anniversary Garden to help individuals, communities, and groups commemorate America’s 400th Anniversary with a signature landscape, garden, or container planting. These signature gardens have red, white, and blue color schemes. Although the commemoration has passed, this guide continues to be useful for creating a patriotic garden.

Jan 14, 2015 426-223 (HORT-86P)
Pest Management Guide: Home Grounds and Animals, 2015 Feb 16, 2015 456-018 (ENTO-69P)
Poison Ivy: Leaves of three? Let it be!

Those who experience the blisters, swelling, and extreme itching that result from contact with poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), poison oak (Toxicodendron pubescens), or poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix) learn to avoid these pesky plants. Although poison oak and poison sumac do grow in Virginia, poison ivy is by far the most common. This publication will help you identify poison ivy, recognize the symptoms of a poison ivy encounter, and control poison ivy around your home.

May 1, 2009 426-109
Resources for Greenhouse and Nursery Operations and Operators

The Virginia Small Business Development Center Network
of the Virginia Department of Business Assistance
coordinates an extensive network of centers statewide that provide a broad range of business counseling
and technical assistance to new or existing small businesses. In the early stages of establishing a business,
the SBDCs within the Virginia network can provide assistance with the preparation of a business plan, marketing assistance, guidance with researching and approaching business financing sources, site location analysis, licensing and regulation information, and cash flow and tax counseling. Many SBDCs also offer specialized training workshops on various business topics, including bookkeeping, personnel management and utilizing computers. For more information and addresses of regional SBDC offices, call the SBDC State Director at (804) 371-8251 or visit their website: www.virginiasbdc.org/

Jul 1, 2009 430-104
Selecting and Using Plant Growth Regulators on Floricultural Crops

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are chemicals that are designed to affect plant growth and/or development (figure 1). They are applied for specific purposes to elicit specific plant responses. Although there is much scientific information on using PGRs in the greenhouse, it is not an exact science. Achieving the best results with PGRs is a combination of art and science — science tempered with a lot of trial and error and a good understanding of plant growth and development.

Nov 18, 2013 430-102 (HORT-43P)
Soil Test Note 19: Vegetable and Flower Gardens (Supplement to Soil Test Report) May 1, 2009 452-719
The Basics of Fertilizer Calculations for Greenhouse Crops Jun 30, 2009 430-100
Understanding Pesticide Labels

Research has shown that consumers find reading and understanding the label to be the most difficult aspect of applying pesticides safely. However, it is essential that you understand the label information before you begin work. The label printed on or attached to a container of pesticide tells you how to use it correctly and warns of any environmental or health safety measures to take.

May 1, 2009 426-707
Using Plant Growth Regulators on Containerized Herbaceous Perennials

There is a tremendous diversity of herbaceous perennial plant species being grown for both the retail and landscaping sectors of the industry. Because of the diversity in species grown, there is much more unknown about perennials production than is known. Growth regulation is of particular concern. In production settings, as well as in retail locations, herbaceous perennials grown in pots tend to stretch and become leggy or simply overgrow their pots before their scheduled market date. These plants are less marketable, and harder to maintain. Many growers resort to pruning, which is not only costly in terms of labor, but also delays plant production two to four weeks.

Jun 8, 2012 430-103 (HORT-4P)