Resources by James E. Johnson

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Economics of Producing an Acre of White Pine Christmas Trees
Growing Christmas trees is an enterprise that has wide appeal as a land management alternative for many landowners in Virginia. Growing Christmas trees, however, is a moderately long-term investment that is time-consuming and laborintensive. A successful plantation requires a full commitment by the landowner and constant attention to culturing the trees. It also is fairly risky, with unpredictable potential for damage from insects, disease, weather, animals, weeds, and mancaused accidents.
May 1, 2009 420-081
Species for Christmas Tree Planting in Virginia
Christmas tree production in Virginia has steadily increased over the last several years. Favorable climate, soils, and proximity to markets place Virginia growers in a highly desirable marketing situation.
May 1, 2009 420-082
Forest Landowner’s Guide To The Measurement Of Timber And Logs
As a forest landowner interested in selling timber, you are naturally interested in the price you will receive for your product and how that price is determined. The measurement of standing timber and logs may seem strange and complicated to you, and it is possible that you may be quoted dramatically different prices based upon differing estimates of the amount of timber you have and the units of measurement used. Methods of measuring timber and the units of measurement often differ between buyers, and, as a seller, you should have an understanding of these methods, the units of measurement, and an idea as to a reasonable price for your timber.
Dec 15, 2014 420-085 (ANR-120P)
Moving Toward Sustainable Forestry: Strategies for Forest Landowners
The forests of the United States have undergone substantial changes since European settlement in the 1600’s. In colonial America, trees were viewed as weeds, and land was cleared to plant agricultural crops. Timber was used to make cabins, fences, and other structures important to frontier life. Forests continued to be cleared as the United States became an important member of the world’s economy. Our forests were one of our most important resources and provided us with wood for housing, paper, and export goods. Forests were cut and the land cleared with little further thought. Deforestation then began to slow, but we still viewed the forest as an unlimited supply of timber, wildlife, homesites, and recreation opportunities. The increasing interest in the environment has now caused us to stand back and think about the sustainability of our forest practices.
Dec 15, 2014 420-144 (AREC-108NP)
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: An Overview May 1, 2009 420-150
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Effects on Water Quality
Over a third of our nation’s streams, lakes, and estuaries are impaired by some form of water pollution (U.S. E.P.A. 1998). Pollutants can enter surface waters from point sources, such as single source industrial discharges and waste-water treatment plants; however, most pollutants result from nonpoint source pollution activities, including runoff from agricultural lands, urban areas, construction and industrial sites, and failed septic tanks.
May 1, 2009 420-151
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Effects on Plant and Animal Communities
The riparian area is that area of land located immediately adjacent to streams, lakes, or other surface waters. Some would describe it as the floodplain. The boundary of the riparian area and the adjoining uplands is gradual and not always well defined. However, riparian areas differ from the uplands because of their high levels of soil moisture, frequent flooding, and unique assemblage of plant and animal communities. Through the interaction of their soils, hydrology, and biotic communities, riparian forests maintain many important physical, biological, and ecological functions and important social benefits.
May 1, 2009 420-152
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Benefits to Communities and Landowners
The riparian area is that area of land located immediately adjacent to streams, lakes, or other surface waters. Some would describe it as the floodplain. The boundary of the riparian area and the adjoining uplands is gradual and not always well defined.
May 1, 2009 420-153
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Factors Influencing Adoption
The riparian area is that area of land located immediately adjacent to streams, lakes, or other surface waters. Some would describe it as the floodplain. The boundary of the riparian area and the adjoining uplands is gradual and not always well defined. However, riparian areas differ from the uplands because of their high levels of soil moisture, frequent flooding, and unique assemblage of plant and animal communities. Through the interaction of their soils, hydrology, and biotic communities, riparian forests maintain many important physical, biological, and ecological functions and important social benefits.
May 1, 2009 420-154
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Planning, Establishment, and Maintenance May 1, 2009 420-155
Understanding the Science Behind Riparian Forest Buffers: Resources for Virginia Landowners
Riparian forest buffers can provide many benefits to society through improved water quality, reduced flooding, reduced sedimentation of streams and reservoirs, and enhanced recreational opportunities. However, the cost of establishing and maintaining these buffers on private lands can be significant to the individual landowner. To help Virginia's landowners in their restoration efforts, the agencies of the commonwealth have agreed to work with individuals and communities in their efforts to restore streamside lands by providing education, technical assistance, and funding. They are joined in this effort by federal agencies and many non-profit conservation organizations.
May 1, 2009 420-156
Shortleaf Pine: An Option for Virginia Landowners May 1, 2009 420-165
Principles of Regeneration Silviculture in Virginia
The processes used to grow forest trees are similar to those required to grow agricultural and horticultural crops. It takes less than a year, however, to grow agricultural and most horticultural crops, while it takes many years to grow a crop of trees. Forest crops consequently require careful planning and proper management to be successful and profitable. Understanding the principles of silviculture aids landowners in managing their lands to obtain a wide variety of forest products and benefits that satisfy their individ-ual objectives. The principles of silviculture are presented in this bulletin.
Aug 25, 2009 420-405
Measuring Standing Trees and Logs Jul 14, 2009 420-560
Coloring Christmas Trees Before Harvest
As the Christmas tree industry develops in Virginia, the production of larger quantities of trees places growers in a more competitive environment. Under conditions of competition, it becomes necessary for growers to produce the highest quality trees possible in order to enjoy marketing success. There are many characteristics of Christmas trees which are widely considered to be quality factors, but the most important are shape, needle retention, straightness, and color.
Mar 19, 2015 420-638(AREC-116P)
Selection and Care of Christmas Trees
For many families, selection and purchase of a Christmas tree is an annual tradition. Indeed, bringing home the tree often signals the official start of the holiday season.
May 1, 2009 420-641
Tree Crops for Marginal Farmland: Loblolly Pine
The Tree Crops for Marginal Farmland Project seeks to provide farmers with basic information about grow¬ing and marketing tree crops. Tree crops have many advantages for farmers with marginal or unused land. The cost of inputs is relatively low, economic returns may be quite competitive with alternatives, and there are important environmental benefits.
Jun 23, 2009 446-609
Tree Crops For Marginal Farmland -- Christmas Trees May 1, 2009 446-605