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David Holshouser

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
2009-2010 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in the Virginia‐Carolina Region Jan 25, 2011 3101-1531
2009-2011 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in the Virginia-Carolina Region Apr 25, 2013 AREC-11P
2010 Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots Jan 24, 2011 3101-1524
2011 Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots Jan 17, 2012 ANR-8
2012 Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots Jan 11, 2013 ANR-37NP
Agronomy Handbook, 2000 May 1, 2009 424-100
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions I: Background and General Information May 1, 2009 450-301
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions II: Identification, Biology, and Ecology May 1, 2009 450-302
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions III: Control with Fungicides May 1, 2009 450-303
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions IV: Cropping Systems and Cultural Practices May 1, 2009 450-304
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions V: Monitoring, Tracking, and Scouting May 1, 2009 450-305
Asian Soybean Rust - Frequently Asked Questions VI: Sprayer and Nozzle Technology May 1, 2009 450-306
Average Relative Yields of Soybean Tested in the Virginia Official Variety Test 2008-2010 Jan 25, 2011 3101-1530
Average Relative Yields of Soybean Tested in the Virginia Official Variety Test 2009-2011 Mar 22, 2012 AREC-17NP
Average Relative Yields of Soybean Tested in the Virginia Official Variety Test 2010-2012 Mar 1, 2013 AREC-35NP
Average Relative Yields of Soybean Varieties Tested in the Virginia Official Variety Test 2007-2009

Selecting high-yielding soybean varieties is one of the most important steps for profitable production. To help
with variety selection, Virginia Tech conducts full-season and double-crop variety tests in five regions of the
Commonwealth. These regions include the Upper and Lower Piedmont, the Upper and Lower Coastal Plain, and
Eastern Shore.

Multi-year averages give greater confidence to variety performance. Data presented here is an average taken
from multiple-locations over the past three growing seasons and includes varieties that have been tested in the last
2 years. The greater number of locations, the greater confidence that the variety will perform as indicated. Actual
yield in bushels per acre is not listed. Instead, variety performance is represented as the average relative yield, or
a percentage above or below the average yield of all varieties of the similar maturity at the same location.
Average relative yield removes some of the bias that occurs with multi-year averages when varieties are not tested
at each location.

Actual yield and other performance data from these tests are available at your county Cooperative Extension
office or can be found on the web at www.vaes.org.vt.edu/TAREC/holshouser/variety.html.

Apr 20, 2010 3004-1443
Days to Soybean Physiological Maturity Sep 9, 2010 3009-1459
Equipment Considerations for No-till Soybean Seeding

No-till planters and drills must be able to cut and handle residue, penetrate the soil to the proper seeding depth, and establish good seed-to-soil contact. Many different soil conditions can be present at the time of planting in the Mid-Atlantic region. Moist soils covered with residue, which may also be wet, can dominate during late fall and early spring and occasionally in the summer. Although this provides for an ideal seed germination environment, such conditions can make it difficult to cut through residue. In contrast, hard and dry conditions may also prevail. This is especially common when no-tilling soybean into wheat stubble during the hot, dry months of June and July. Although cutting residue is easier during dry conditions, it is more difficult to penetrate the hard, dry soils. Proper timing, equipment selection and adjustments, and management can overcome these difficult issues.

May 1, 2009 442-456
Green Stem Syndrome in Soybean Dec 22, 2009 2912-1430
Identifying Soybean Fields at Risk to Leaf-Feeding Insects


What is LAI? Leaf area index (LAI) is the ratio of leaf area to land area. Soybean requires LAI values of at least 3.5 to 4.0 by early to mid-reproductive developmental stages to achieve maximum yield for that year and environment. A soybean crop that does not achieve adequate LAI could be at risk to yield loss from insect leaf-feeders, whereas, fields with high (4+) LAI can sustain significant insect feeding with little to no effect on yield. This publication will aid producers in evaluating soybean fields at risk to yield reduction from leaf-feeding insects.

May 1, 2009 444-203
Palmer Amaranth Control in Cotton: 2008 & 2009 Efficacy Experiments Dec 22, 2009 2912-1428
Palmer Amaranth Control in Soybean: 2009 Efficacy Experiments Dec 22, 2009 2912-1429
Planter/Drill Considerations for Conservation Tillage Systems

No-till planters and drills must be able to cut and handle residue, penetrate the soil to the proper seeding depth, and establish good seed-to-soil contact. Many different soil conditions can be present in the Mid-Atlantic region at planting time. Moist soils covered with residue, which may also be wet, can dominate during the late fall and early spring and occasionally, in the summer. Although this condition provides an ideal environment for seed germination, it can make it difficult to cut through the residue. In contrast, hard and dry conditions may also prevail. Although cutting residue is easier during dry conditions, it is more difficult to penetrate the hard, dry soils. Proper timing, equipment selection and adjustments, and crop management can overcome these difficult issues.

May 1, 2009 442-457
Precision Farming Tools: Soil Electrical Conductivity

Soil electrical conductivity (EC) is a measurement that correlates with soil properties that affect crop productivity, including soil texture, cation exchange capacity (CEC), drainage conditions, organic matter level, salinity, and subsoil characteristics. This publication discusses: 1) How, with field verification, soil EC can be related to specific soil properties that affect crop yield, such as topsoil depth, pH, salt concentrations, and available water-holding capacity; 2) Soil EC maps often visually correspond to patterns on yield maps and can help explain yield variation; and 3) Other uses of soil EC maps (Table 1), including developing management zones, guiding directed soil sampling, assigning variable rates of crop inputs, fine tuning NRCS soil maps, improving the placement and interpretation of on-farm tests, salinity diagnosis, and planning drainage remediation.

May 1, 2009 442-508
Precision Farming Tools: Variable-Rate Application

There are a number of questions that must be answered before establishing a site-specific crop management (SSCM) program. Many of these questions are economic, some are agronomic and environmental, and others are technology-related. This publication is intended to discuss variable-rate devices that are available, while providing an understanding of which technologies might best fit a cropping system and production management strategy.

Aug 1, 2011 442-505
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Cotton

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per 30 foot of row can reduce cotton yield by 6 to 12%.

May 1, 2009 2805-1001
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Soybean

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. Four Palmer amaranth plants per 100 ft2 of row can reduce soybean yield by 12 to 17%.

May 1, 2009 2808-1006
Soybean Choices and Challenges for Your Family

What do you know about soybeans? Research on soybeans is showing exciting health benefits for all family
members. This publication focuses on three topics that will help you enjoy the health benefits of soybeans.

May 1, 2009 348-040
Soybean Disease Control: Response of Soybeans to Foliar Sprays of Fungicides in 2005 May 1, 2009 450-561
Soybean Neamtode Management Guide

Nematodes, or unsegmented roundworms, feed in or on roots of plants. More than 100 species of plant-parasitic nematodes feed on soybean roots, but only a few are economically important. In Virginia, most nematode species can be found in the sandier Coastal Plain soils. However, some nematode species can also develop and reproduce on the heavier-textured soils of the Piedmont and Shenandoah Valley. This guide will focus on those that can cause damage to soybeans in Virginia.

Jan 2, 2012 AREC-1
Soybean Reproductive Development Stages Nov 25, 2013 AREC-59NP
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Foliar Fungicides in 2006 May 1, 2009 450-562
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2007 May 1, 2009 2810-1016
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2008 Nov 19, 2009 2911-1420
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2009 Dec 21, 2010 3012-1520
Suggested Soybean Seeding Rates for Virginia Jun 11, 2010 3006-1447
Tips for Profitable Variety Selection: How to Use Data From Different Types of Variety Trials

Selecting an appropriate, high-yielding variety is one of the most important management decisions that producers make. Yield potential is clearly important, but the decision is complicated by such factors as the cropping system, the need for disease resistance, end-use quality goals, year-to-year climatic variation, and the need to select multiple varieties in order to reduce risk by spreading out flowering and maturity dates.

Jul 29, 2011 424-040
Troubleshooting The Soybean Crop Nov 16, 2012 AREC-25NP
Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots 2006 May 1, 2009 424-109-06
Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots 2007 May 1, 2009 424-109-07
Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots 2008 May 1, 2009 2901-1032
Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots 2009

The purpose of the publication is to provide research-based information to aid in the decision-making process for grain producers in Virginia. It provides an unbiased evaluation of certain varieties, management practices, and new technology through on-farm replicated research using producer equipment and time. The plot work and analyzed results enable those producers to make management decisions based on research and provides them a greater opportunity to improve yields and profits, which can improve the quality of life for them and their families. The success of these on-farm plots is very dependant on the cooperative effort of the producer and the assisting agribusiness.

Mar 24, 2010 3003-1441
Virginia On-Farm Soybean Test Plots 2013 Jan 22, 2014 ANR-101NP
Virginia Soybean Performance Tests 2009

The purpose of this publication is to provide performance data of the many soybean varieties offered for sale in Virginia. These data should be of benefit to producers and agribusinesses in making selections of varieties for their use. It is realized that not all varieties that are offered for sale in Virginia are included in these tests. There is no implication that varieties not included are inferior in any way, but only that they have not been tested.

Dec 17, 2009 2912-1427
Virginia Soybean Performance Tests 2010

The purpose of this publication is to provide performance data of the many soybean varieties offered for sale in Virginia. These data should be of benefit to producers and agribusinesses in making selections of varieties for their use. It is realized that not all varieties that are offered for sale in Virginia are included in these tests. There is no implication that varieties not included are inferior in any way, but only that they have not been tested.

Mar 1, 2011 3102-1536
Virginia Soybean Performance Tests 2011

The purpose of this publication is to provide performance data of the many soybean varieties offered for sale in Virginia.  These data should be of benefit to producers and agribusinesses in making selections of varieties for their use.  It is realized that not all varieties that are offered for sale in Virginia are included in these tests.  There is no implication that varieties not included are inferior in any way, but only that they have not been tested. 

Feb 15, 2012 AREC-16
Virginia Soybean Performance Tests 2012

The purpose of this publication is to provide performance data of the many soybean varieties offered for sale in Virginia.  These data should be of benefit to producers and agribusinesses in making selections of varieties for their use.  It is realized that not all varieties that are offered for sale in Virginia are included in these tests.  There is no implication that varieties not included are inferior in any way, but only that they have not been tested. 

Feb 14, 2013 AREC-40
Virginia Soybean Performance Tests 2013

The purpose of this publication is to provide performance data of the many soybean varieties offered for sale in Virginia.  These data should be of benefit to producers and agribusinesses in making selections of varieties for their use.  It is realized that not all varieties that are offered for sale in Virginia are included in these tests.  There is no implication that varieties not included are inferior in any way, but only that they have not been tested. 

Feb 21, 2014 AREC-79NP
Virginia Soybean Update Jul 10, 2013 AREC-49NP
Virginia Soybean Variety Evaluation Tests 2004 May 1, 2009 424-107-04
Virginia Soybean Variety Evaluation Tests 2005 May 1, 2009 424-107-05
Virginia Soybean Variety Evaluation Tests 2006 Apr 28, 2009 424-107-06