ID

FST-234P

Authors as Published

Sara Beth Dodson, Graduate Student, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Tech; Renee R. Boyer, Associate Professor, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Tech; Melissa Chase, Consumer Food Safety Program Manager, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Tech; Joseph Eifert, Associate Professor, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Tech; Joell Eifert, Director of Food Innovation, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Tech; Laura Strawn, Assistant Professor, Food Science and Technology, Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center; Abigail Villalba, Extension Specialist, Food Science and Technology, Virginia Seafood Agricultural Research and Extension Center

JPG. Safe Handling and Storing of Raw Fruits and Vegetables

This publication is available in a PDF file format only.

Fruits and vegetables are essential for a healthy diet. Nutritious produce can be purchased at your local grocery store or farmers market, or even grown in
your backyard. While produce is usually safe, it can become contaminated throughout the farm-to-fork continuum with harmful microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites, that can cause illness (pathogens). A foodborne illness, often referred to as “food poisoning,” can occur through consumption of contaminated foods.


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Publication Date

August 29, 2016