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Stress After a Disaster

ID

FCS-109P

Authors as Published

 Karen DeBord, Extension Specialist, Family and Human Development, Virginia Tech 

    Cover, Stress After a Disaster

This publication is available in a PDF file format only.


During a crisis such as a flood, people often push through the emotion instead of dealing with the loss and stress of the immediate situation. During the early stages when those affected are recovering their belongings and their livestock or repairing damage, the adrenaline of the crisis allows them to keep busy on tasks toward recovery. That works for a while, but be aware that a tipping point can occur, where stress is too much to handle. Sometimes the smallest event (finding a broken keepsake or losing the truck keys) could set off an emotional outrage or emotional release. 

Rights


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Publisher

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Date

October 16, 2015


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