ID

CSES-193NP

Authors as Published

Mark S. Reiter, Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech; W. Hunter Frame, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech; Wade E. Thomason, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, J. Scott Reiter, Prince George County, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech; Janet Spencer, Isle of Wight County, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech; Ursula Deitch, Northampton County, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech

This publication is available in a PDF file format only. 

 According to Meteorologist Scott Minnick with the NOAA-National Weather Service in Wakefield, VA, May 2017 is “yet another wet and cloudy May for the record books. With the rain on [May 31, 2017], Norfolk moved up to the 3rd wettest May on record.” The 2017 growing year is almost identical to last year (the wettest May on record for Norfolk, VA), with a dry March and April leading into a record breaking cool and wet May as corn tries to establish roots. Young corn largely depends on residual and starter fertilizer prior to sidedress applications and these fractions can be impacted greatly with excessive rain 


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Publication Date

July 10, 2017