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Authors as Published

Stephanie K. Goodwin, RD, Family Nutrition Program Graduate Assistant

Circle the cereal below that is the healthiest choice. Hints: Look at the number of sugar grams per serving. Choose the lower amount. Also look at the ingredients list and try to find a cereal that has whole grains listed as the first ingredient. Don’t pick a cereal that lists sugar, high fructose corn syrup, or any other word that means sugar as the first ingredient.

Frosted Fruit O’s

Ingredients: Sugar, Corn Flour, Wheat Flour, Oat Flour, Partially Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil (one or more of: Coconut, Cottonseed, and Soybean), Salt, Sodium Ascorbate and Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Niacinamide, Reduced Iron, Natural Orange, Lemon, Cherry, Raspberry, Blueberry, Lime, and other natural flavors, Red #40, Blue #2, Zinc Oxide, Yellow #6, Turmeric Color, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Blue #1, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Annatto Color, Vitamin A Palmitate, BHT (Preservative), Folic Acid, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D

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Corn Squares

Ingredients: Milled Corn, Rice, Brown Sugar, Salt, Malt Flavoring, Baking Soda, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Iron, Niacinamide, Turmeric Color, Zinc Oxide, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Vitamin A Palmitate, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12, and Vitamin D

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Chocolate Puffs

Ingredients: sugar, corn meal, cocoa, canola and/or rice bran oil, high fructose corn syrup, corn starch, modified corn starch, cocoa processed with alkali, salt, calcium carbonate, fructose, beet powder and caramel color, trisodium phosphate, artificial flavor, zinc and iron (mineral nutrients), vitamin C (sodium ascorbate), a B vitamin (niacinamide), vitamin B6 ( pyridoxine hydrochloride), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B1 (thiamin mononitrate), a B vitamin (folic acid), vitamin B12, wheat starch. Freshness preserved by BHT.

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Reviewed by: Kathy Hosig, Ph.D., MPH, RD, Associate Professor, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

This publication was partially funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).  The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low incomes. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact your local county or city Department of Social Services (phone listed under city/county government).  For help finding a local number, call toll-free: 1-800-552-3431 (M-F 8:15-5:00, except holidays).  By calling your local DSS office, you can get other useful information about services. 

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, age, disability, or political beliefs.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call, toll free, (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

This publication was partially funded by the Expanded Food Nutrition Education Program, USDA, CSREES.


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Publication Date

October 19, 2010